1-20 of 264 Search Results for

language

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2015) 26 (2): 42–62.
Published: 01 June 2015
... was the scene of Arab settlement and later Ottoman rule, and today one-fifth of the population is Muslim Turkish, while the rest is predominantly Greek Orthodox. Malta was under direct Arab rule and its language is Semitic in origin, although its population today is almost exclusively Roman Catholic. Both...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2008) 19 (4): 14–28.
Published: 01 December 2008
..., the Greek population of the two islands was granted specific civic, cultural, and religious rights by the 1923 Treaty of Lausanne. The treaty remains valid to this day. Turkey deliberately violated the rights of this population because of its ethnicity, religion, and language. The author analyzes...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2012) 23 (2): 42–63.
Published: 01 June 2012
..., the intensification of its illiberal history revisionism, the expropriation of the Bulgarian language and parts of Bulgarian history, and the mistreatment of minorities. George C. Papavizas is a retired scientist of the US Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. He is the author of Blood...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2011) 22 (1): 41–60.
Published: 01 March 2011
... perspective could better elucidate the ancient Greek-­Albanian relations. For 1. The magazine Mbesa, published by the Arvanite Association of Greece, repeatedly states that Arvanite is the language of the Pelasgians. See, for example, “Two Arvanite Goddesses in the Greek Pantheon,” Mbesa, January 2005...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2004) 15 (4): 115–124.
Published: 01 December 2004
... countries: Greece, Albania, Bulgaria, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Croatia. Yet those Vlachs of the Balkans not fully assimilated by their host nations have one thing in com- mon—they speak a language apparently deriving from the Latin...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2010) 21 (2): 18–46.
Published: 01 June 2010
... organizations in the 1990s explic- itly banned any assimilatory policies that aimed to change an individual’s language, culture, and national identity or to transfer groups from one place to another because of their ethnic or national identity. Before the 1990s, the human rights texts did not contain...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2003) 14 (3): 1–5.
Published: 01 September 2003
... longer than all but two. Preserving Constitutional War Powers Robert C. Byrd In October 2002, Congress passed, with minimal debate, a resolution autho- rizing the president of the United States to launch military strikes in Iraq. The language of the resolution...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2010) 21 (3): 86–103.
Published: 01 September 2010
... “Macedonians” by 1945, with new roots, history, and a new “Macedonian” language, a modification of the Bulgarian language by Tito’s communist regime.2 2. Thousands of FYROM Slavs, including Ljupko Georgijevski, former prime minister and presi- dent of the Bulgarian Internal Macedonian Revolutionary...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2017) 28 (3): 27–55.
Published: 01 September 2017
... share language or ethnicity, they build camaraderie through shared day-­to-­day interactions. Thus, a sense of connection is built on tangi- 5. Ibid. Badruzzaman, Cohen, and Kushi: Contending Images in Turkey’s Headscarf Debate  31 ble events. In contrast, members of communities...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (4): 142–159.
Published: 01 December 2006
... language being granted equal status to that of Serbo-Croatian on all official and legal documents.17 In addition, Albanian education was emphasized throughout the province, resulting in a growing number of Alba- nian schools, which while providing a better educated and professional work force within...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2014) 25 (2): 48–60.
Published: 01 June 2014
... Jamie Coomarasamy Chinese leaders are known for their somber suits, their immaculate hair, and their ability to draw up impenetrable communiqués at the end of Communist Party plenums. What they’re not usually known for is waxing lyrical in wist- ful, romanticized language. So when President Xi...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (3): 26–42.
Published: 01 September 2006
...- tian Orthodox, Catholics, and Muslims, the last forming the majority. Tribal fragmentation, religious divisions, and geographical barriers in conjunction with the lack of an independent church and separate language had precluded Albanian attempts at the construction of a national identity...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (2): 84–87.
Published: 01 June 2006
... chapter, Rosello uses semi-autobiographical novels and essays as the basis for discussion of linguistic encounters. She convincingly argues that there is “a direct and conscious link . . . between the language one decided to use and the result one wants to achieve.” From the outset, she rejects...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (2): 87–91.
Published: 01 June 2006
... chapter, Rosello uses semi-autobiographical novels and essays as the basis for discussion of linguistic encounters. She convincingly argues that there is “a direct and conscious link . . . between the language one decided to use and the result one wants to achieve.” From the outset, she rejects...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (4): 160–163.
Published: 01 December 2006
... Spain. Harvey also examines in great detail and enthusiasm the liter- ary culture of Islamic communities, and he expands on both the spoken and written languages of Muslim communities in Spain. The appendices are most useful to special- ized scholars who want to know more about the Muslim traditions...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (4): 163–166.
Published: 01 December 2006
... and expulsion of Muslims from Spain. Harvey also examines in great detail and enthusiasm the liter- ary culture of Islamic communities, and he expands on both the spoken and written languages of Muslim communities in Spain. The appendices are most useful to special- ized scholars who want to know more...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (4): 167–171.
Published: 01 December 2006
... expands on both the spoken and written languages of Muslim communities in Spain. The appendices are most useful to special- ized scholars who want to know more about the Muslim traditions of spoken and written languages and the stories of their experiences. The import of this historical episode...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (3): 1–7.
Published: 01 September 2001
... language. Language clothes actions and determines the rationale committing them. Opinion makers know that the choice of words is vitally important in the phrasing of a question—since it has a decisive bearing on the answer. This knowledge is shared...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2004) 15 (1): 58–74.
Published: 01 March 2004
... and replaced it with a policy of regional bilingualism. It afforded regional languages such as Catalan, Galician, and Euskera (the Basque lan- guage) co-official status (together with Castilian) within their respective autonomous communities. The implementation of this policy has engendered...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2008) 19 (2): 99–121.
Published: 01 June 2008
... Imams’ Association 2.  Media outlets •  three newspapers: Yeni Ozgur Politika in Germany and Gundem and Azadiya Welat (a Kurdish-language publication) in Turkey •  two news agencies: Firat News Agency and Dicle Haber Ajansi •  two satellite TV stations: Roj TV (Denmark...