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Slovenia

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Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2016) 27 (4): 42–60.
Published: 01 December 2016
...Zlatko Šabič; Ana Bojinović Fenko; Petra Roter The essay contributes to the scholarship on parliamentary diplomacy in the Mediterranean region through the lens of a small state: Slovenia. We argue that, because of limited resources, small states need to diversify their means of foreign policy...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2008) 19 (3): 115–122.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Anton Grizold Anton Grizold is professor of sociology and dean of social sciences at the University of Ljubljana, Republic of Slovenia. He served as minister of defense from 2000 to 2004. Copyright 2008 by Mediterranean Affairs, Inc. 2008 Slovenia’s Defense Policy...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2004) 15 (2): 58–82.
Published: 01 June 2004
... that Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Montenegro, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Romania, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania, and Turkey belong to southeastern Europe. During the Cold War, the majority of these countries were considered part of the Eastern bloc, or simply...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2016) 27 (4): 2–20.
Published: 01 December 2016
..., there are thirteen bicameral and fifteen unicameral parliaments, broken down as follows: • Bicameral states: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, and the United Kingdom • Unicameral states: Bulgaria, Croatia...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2008) 19 (4): 81–90.
Published: 01 December 2008
...- govic of Bosnia, Milan Kucan of Slovenia, and others. Many continue to do so today. Unsurprisingly, journalists and scholars took to labeling various Balkan political leaders “nationalist” — and not just when they appealed to plainly nationalist sentiments and aspired to nationalist goals...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (2): 48–52.
Published: 01 June 2006
... war when they shot down a Yugoslav army helicopter. Following intense German pressure, the European powers agreed to the recognition of Slovenia and Croatia, in January 1992. Soon thereafter, the United States declared that it, too, would recognize Slovenia and Croatia, provided Bosnia...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (1): 39–50.
Published: 01 March 2001
... and assisting the separatist movements in both Slovenia and Croatia. This had the effect of encouraging the extremists on all sides and of undermining the authority of the central government. In a desperate but futile last-minute effort to keep the country together...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (2): 101–118.
Published: 01 June 2001
..., and then on to the Sava and the Danube. As such, the terri- tories that make up present-day Croatia, Slovenia, and parts of Bosnia- Herzegovina came under Rome’s jurisdiction; most of the rest of the penin- sula existed as Byzantine provinces until the 1400s...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2015) 26 (2): 115–127.
Published: 01 June 2015
... 1. John Cox, The History of Serbia (London: Greenwood, 2002), 82. 2. As a part of this dismemberment, the Hungarians were allotted parts of Slovenia, Croatia, and Vojvodina. Bulgarians were given most of Macedonia. Italy expanded its holding along the Dalma- tian coastal frontier (though...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (3): 47–56.
Published: 01 September 2001
... in Slovenia, Croatia, and Bosnia were caused by others, putting the Serbs on the defensive. The war in Slovenia was somewhat dif- ferent from the other two in that it forced the Yugoslav government, then dominated by non-Serbs, to try to stop the Slovene seizure...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2009) 20 (3): 40–50.
Published: 01 September 2009
... as candidates in the now globally engaged security appa- ratus, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, as well as in their continental economic organization, the European Union. Slovenia became a member of NATO in the alliance’s fifth expansion round in March 2004 and of the EU the following May...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2007) 18 (3): 110–113.
Published: 01 September 2007
... entities as Russia and China had to be recognized because of their history and world position, it was hoped that in the smaller world of southeastern Europe the standards of liberal democracy of Western Europe could be established. The highly ethnocentric Slovenia had no minori- ties to oppress...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2007) 18 (3): 114–116.
Published: 01 September 2007
.... Although such massive and repressive entities as Russia and China had to be recognized because of their history and world position, it was hoped that in the smaller world of southeastern Europe the standards of liberal democracy of Western Europe could be established. The highly ethnocentric Slovenia...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2007) 18 (3): 117–120.
Published: 01 September 2007
... entities as Russia and China had to be recognized because of their history and world position, it was hoped that in the smaller world of southeastern Europe the standards of liberal democracy of Western Europe could be established. The highly ethnocentric Slovenia had no minori- ties to oppress...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2009) 20 (2): 138–141.
Published: 01 June 2009
... Serbian culture that is not possible from ordinary policy papers. Another essay using the oblique approach concerns the introduction of supermarkets to Yugoslavia. They initially appeared in Serbia, later in Slovenia, and now, of course, are everywhere. It gives the author a chance to compare...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2009) 20 (2): 141–144.
Published: 01 June 2009
... Serbian culture that is not possible from ordinary policy papers. Another essay using the oblique approach concerns the introduction of supermarkets to Yugoslavia. They initially appeared in Serbia, later in Slovenia, and now, of course, are everywhere. It gives the author a chance to compare...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2013) 24 (2): 39–58.
Published: 01 June 2013
... standing upright in cruise missile cross-­hairs — left behind regions dangerously polluted with dust, shards, and larger particles from depleted-­uranium (DU) ordnance casings after what had already been a decade of fighting in Serbia, Bosnia, Kosovo, Montenegro, Kosovo, Vojvodina, Slovenia...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (2): 7–16.
Published: 01 June 2006
.... In sum, most of the countries that seceded from Yugoslavia have pro- gressed in terms of the establishment of democracy, security, and peace with their neighbors. All the countries are candidates for membership in the EU (except for Slovenia, which is already a full member) and are in various stages...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2008) 19 (4): 54–67.
Published: 01 December 2008
... four African states and Turkey. Within southeastern Europe itself, four of Kosovo’s neighbors have recognized it (Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Slovenia, and Tur- key), while seven regional neighbors (Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cyprus, Greece, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, and of course Serbia) have...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2014) 25 (4): 5–26.
Published: 01 December 2014
... resistance move- ments in the occupied territories — Albania, Croatia, Dalmatia, Greece, Mon- tenegro, Slovenia, and parts of the Soviet Union — they employed draconian measures of collective punishment that included roundups, the burning of villages, shootings of hostages, massacres, and mass...