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Qatar crisis

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Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 March 2018) 29 (1): 19–35.
Published: 01 March 2018
... at some exceptional moments, disagreements among them are still significant. © 2018 by Mediterranean Affairs, Inc. 2018 Islamic military alliance terrorism Qatar crisis Whither Inter- Sunni Relations in the Middle East? Turkey and the Gulf Cooperation Council Nuri Yes¸ilyurt...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 June 2016) 27 (2): 67–88.
Published: 01 June 2016
... individual citizen and has insisted that the state not interfere with that act of conscience. The opposite is true in the Muslim world, where the law punishes blasphemy and apostasy and enforces less than equal rights for women. Apostasy is a capital offense in Afghanistan, Brunei, Mauritania, Qatar...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 March 2018) 29 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 March 2018
..., in line with the objectives of the monarchies of the Arabian Peninsula — Saudi Arabia and Qatar — is to weaken the Shiite bloc of influence in Syria, expressed mainly by Iran, the Alawites under Assad, and Hezbollah. At any rate, a possible US military intervention should not be definitively...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 March 2018) 29 (1): 70–95.
Published: 01 March 2018
... domestic product (GDP) per capita (with a score of 6.6 out of 100) and political-stability risk (22.2). Some of its Arab neighbors have higher food security index rankings. While Jordan is ranked 60, Qatar 20, Oman 26, Kuwait 27, the United Arab Emirates 30, Saudi Arabia 32, Bahrain 33, and Egypt...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 September 2009) 20 (3): 1–18.
Published: 01 September 2009
..., they can be split evenly into two groups: those that enjoy considerable surplus income at present (Kuwait, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates) and those Peterson: Life after Oil  3 Table 1...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 June 2013) 24 (2): 5–38.
Published: 01 June 2013
... literature.1 The Arab world’s eight monarchies — Bahrain, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) —  with the notable exception of the first, a tiny island kingdom off the coast of Saudi Arabia, have evaded the brunt of the upheaval and received relatively...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 September 2015) 26 (3): 94–116.
Published: 01 September 2015
... later, one can safely say the answer to that question is “no.” The democratic momentum of the Arab Spring faltered, while Erdo- gan’s closest allies in the region — Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi and Qatar’s emir Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani — are no longer in power. Mean- 1. “Turkey Election...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 September 2015) 26 (3): 49–66.
Published: 01 September 2015
... interested in developing Iran’s hydrocarbon resources. Sanctions have also prevented Iran from reaching its potential in the natu- ral gas sector. Iran shares with Qatar the largest gas structure in the world, called the South Par in Iran and the North Field in Qatar. The authorities have designed a...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 September 2008) 19 (3): 68–87.
Published: 01 September 2008
... In this essay I seek to document and analyze the relations between Turkey and the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) —  Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Uman — during the period from 2003 to 2007. I focus especially on their increased trade...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 December 2006) 17 (4): 13–45.
Published: 01 December 2006
... Third World states construct their alignments on their perceptions of how to best protect themselves from 3. See Anoushiravan Ehteshami and Raymond Hinnebusch, Syria and Iran: Middle Level Powers in a Penetrated Region (New York: Routledge, 1997); Tom Nairn, The Break-Up of Britain: Crisis...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 September 2003) 14 (3): 12–24.
Published: 01 September 2003
...Patrick Theros Mediterranean Affairs, Inc. 2003 Patrick Theros served as U.S. ambassador to Qatar and currently is president of the U.S.-Qatar Business Council. Ruining the Neighborhood: War with Iraq and the Neighbors Patrick Theros...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 September 2009) 20 (3): 63–76.
Published: 01 September 2009
... Cairo and four summit meetings were held at Sharm al-Sheikh, Egypt; Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Doha, Qatar; and Kuwait City. The lists of attendees and statements made in these meetings reflect the lack of consensus among Arab leaders on how to approach the Arab-Israeli conflict. Amr Moussa, the Arab...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 June 2015) 26 (2): 42–62.
Published: 01 June 2015
... their Arab neighbors. In the Middle East, Cyprus has embassies in Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Syria, and the United Arab Emirates.57 It handles relations with Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia through its embassy in France, those with Sudan...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 March 2017) 28 (1): 99–116.
Published: 01 March 2017
..., ideological, and economic experiment in Syrian Kurdistan. As a typical communist organization, the 14. It should be noted that foreign powers such as Qatar and Turkey indirectly supported the jihad- ists. See David Blair and Richard Spencer, “How Qatar Is Funding the Rise of Islamist Extremists...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 December 2013) 24 (4): 43–67.
Published: 01 December 2013
... the year 2008 in table 2, the GDP growth can be discerned before the impact of the international financial crisis of 2009 hit the region. In oil-exporting countries, Qatar and Oman experienced the highest GDP growth, with 25.5 percent growth in Qatar and 12.8 percent growth in Oman. As for non...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 June 2013) 24 (2): 81–103.
Published: 01 June 2013
... representation in the following Middle East countries: Egypt, Israel, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) at the 46. For a list of Gulen Sema Foundation institutions in Albania, see Besnik Sinani, “The Gulen Movement in Albania: New Opportunities,” 24 February 2011...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 March 2015) 26 (1): 40–58.
Published: 01 March 2015
... security interdependence with WANA, a trait that has become markedly more prominent over the past decade, despite increased instability since 2010. With about half of its total oil and gas imports coming from Libya, Algeria, Iran, Iraq, Qatar, and Saudi Arabia, Italy’s energy security is heavily...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 September 2017) 28 (3): 93–111.
Published: 01 September 2017
... gas structure in Iran and around the world, holding approximately 40 percent of the country’s reserves. Iran shares the structure with Qatar. The anticipated rise in foreign investment in the coming years is certain to accelerate the ongoing efforts to fully develop the field. Lack of...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 March 2006) 17 (1): 116–132.
Published: 01 March 2006
..., does not have the pedigree of the Qureshi tribe of the Prophet Mohammed. The question of succession is becoming increasingly controversial and at times problematic. The arrival of the next generation of leaders in Jordan, Morocco, Qatar, and Syria in recent years was not without its share of...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (1 September 2017) 28 (3): 112–130.
Published: 01 September 2017
... was engulfed with violence and bloodshed of such magnitude. Countries where authoritarian regimes still manage to survive offered various concessions to forestall fur- ther disruption: • Increased salaries in Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emir- ates (UAE) • Calls for...