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British Empire

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Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2016) 27 (3): 88–104.
Published: 01 September 2016
...Ilia Xypolia This essay draws on archival documents to explore the British Empire's plans for establishing a university in the eastern Mediterranean in the 1930s. The British possessions in the region were at stake in the aftermath of the First World War. Since the early 1930s the Foreign Office...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2014) 25 (3): 5–26.
Published: 01 September 2014
...Craig A. Harrington British geostrategic considerations underwent an ad hoc metamorphosis during the decade following Great Britain’s retreat from formal territorial empire (1957-67). This essay investigates the shifting roles envisioned by British policymakers for vestigial colonial holdings...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2014) 25 (1): 65–76.
Published: 01 March 2014
... by several major pow- ers over the centuries: by the Romans, later by the Byzantines (becoming part of the Byzantine Empire), by Arabs, the Crusaders, the Venetians, and in 1570 by the Ottomans. In 1878 the Ottomans leased the island to the British, in 1914 the British Empire formally annexed...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2016) 27 (3): 1–5.
Published: 01 September 2016
... Propaganda and Plans for a British University in the Near East” examines the internal debate within the British Foreign Office in the 1930s about whether to establish a university in the Near East and to shore up regional attitudes toward the British Empire. As Xypolia demonstrates, the plans to build...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2014) 25 (1): 111–113.
Published: 01 March 2014
..., or redoubt, for the eastern Med- iterranean, and Cypriot history reflects this fact. Since the fall of the Roman Empire, Cyprus has been under the control of the major powers of the day, stretching from the Byzantine Empire and French crusaders to Venice, the Ottomans, and later the British Empire...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2014) 25 (1): 113–117.
Published: 01 March 2014
..., for the eastern Med- iterranean, and Cypriot history reflects this fact. Since the fall of the Roman Empire, Cyprus has been under the control of the major powers of the day, stretching from the Byzantine Empire and French crusaders to Venice, the Ottomans, and later the British Empire. These occupying...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (4): 160–163.
Published: 01 December 2006
... to declare ‘to succeeding ages that that place was once a mem- ber of the British Empire.’ ” By the revolution of 1688 in England and the publication of John Locke’s Two Treatises on Government in 1690, the English had discovered that, as Matar writes, “in the regions of Islam, Britons would...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (4): 163–166.
Published: 01 December 2006
... that [King Charles II] wanted buried at the site to declare ‘to succeeding ages that that place was once a mem- ber of the British Empire.’ ” By the revolution of 1688 in England and the publication of John Locke’s Two Treatises on Government in 1690, the English had discovered that, as Matar writes...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (4): 167–171.
Published: 01 December 2006
... the military citadel at Tangier was abandoned totally by the British, “leav- ing behind them ruins and destruction — except for a few coins that [King Charles II] wanted buried at the site to declare ‘to succeeding ages that that place was once a mem- ber of the British Empire.’ ” By the revolution...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2015) 26 (4): 89–109.
Published: 01 December 2015
..., telegram no. 1392 from Baghdad to Foreign Office, 14 November 1956, UK National Archives, London. 21. Michael Eppel, “Decline of British Influence in the Middle East,” in Demise of the British Empire in the Middle East, ed. Michael J. Cohen and Martin Kolinsky (Portland, OR: Frank Cass, 1998), 139...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2016) 27 (3): 6–37.
Published: 01 September 2016
...- ited liability. These developments were of historic importance and lay the groundwork for the development of commerce and trade on a global scale, which made possible the Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, and British Empires. They also underlie the Industrial Revolution, which made possible the age...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (1): 34–47.
Published: 01 March 2006
..., he con- cluded, were the result of “insufficient American involvement and ambition” in the world. The solution “is to be more expansive in our goals and more assertive in our implementation.”14 Boot cited the British Empire in the nine- teenth century as the proper model for a post-9/11 US...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2005) 16 (1): 16–32.
Published: 01 March 2005
... as Great Powers in the Balkans these days. The policies of Austrian and Hungarian monarchs, Turkish sultans, British empire builders, German power brokers, and Napoleonic reformers have given way, at best, to democratically based multilateral support mechanisms and, at worst, Balkan fatigue...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2010) 21 (2): 114–118.
Published: 01 June 2010
... the Greek and Turkish Cypriots did not agree. In such a case, constitutional deadlock and intercommunal disputes would provide fertile ground for British interference. Hence, there is no surprise that imperial Britain pitted the minority Turkish Cypriots against the majority Greek Cypriots in order...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2010) 21 (2): 118–121.
Published: 01 June 2010
... the Greek and Turkish Cypriots did not agree. In such a case, constitutional deadlock and intercommunal disputes would provide fertile ground for British interference. Hence, there is no surprise that imperial Britain pitted the minority Turkish Cypriots against the majority Greek Cypriots in order...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2010) 21 (2): 121–124.
Published: 01 June 2010
... the Greek and Turkish Cypriots did not agree. In such a case, constitutional deadlock and intercommunal disputes would provide fertile ground for British interference. Hence, there is no surprise that imperial Britain pitted the minority Turkish Cypriots against the majority Greek Cypriots in order...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2012) 23 (3): 123–125.
Published: 01 September 2012
... in looking at this contentious subject. He avoids placing too much blame on anyone for the unsatisfactory outcome of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, perhaps excusing more than should be the case the French effort to maintain their position despite lacking the power to do so. However, the British...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2012) 23 (3): 115–119.
Published: 01 September 2012
... in looking at this contentious subject. He avoids placing too much blame on anyone for the unsatisfactory outcome of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, perhaps excusing more than should be the case the French effort to maintain their position despite lacking the power to do so. However, the British...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2012) 23 (3): 119–122.
Published: 01 September 2012
... of the Ottoman Empire (would the Treaty of Sèvres be enforced?) as about the Arabs and Jews. The British unilateral withdrawal from Palestine in 1948 was part of their similar actions everywhere (India, for example), and reflected the diminished power of Britain after 1945. However, the question...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (2): 66–82.
Published: 01 June 2001
... as any for a splendid exile, and it also had a king. The minister was in awe of kings, including self-appointed ones. Sir Andrew Ryan, ambassador of Great Britain, had decided not to set up shop in Tirana, the capital. Instead, he kept the British mission...