Most scholarship on nineteenth-century labor internationalism focuses on the efforts of labor and socialist leaders to create solidarities across national boundaries among an emerging new class of industrial workers, and the labor unions and political parties created to represent them, through organizations such as the First and Second Internationals. In this provocative and important book, however, Niall Whelehan emphasizes the significance of battles over land ownership, and the conditions under which tenant farmers and agricultural laborers worked, in contributing to the radical forms of internationalism that emerged in the late nineteenth century. Specifically, Whelehan focuses on a period of agrarian agitation that raged in Ireland from 1879 to 1882 (the Irish Land War), and on the spread of Irish Land League and Ladies’ Land League chapters to diaspora communities across the globe. He argues that Land League activists, especially those from emigrant communities, often traveled to different countries and simultaneously...

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