Frank P. Barajas has written an original history of the Chicano movement. While other scholars stress generational divisions between Mexican immigrants, Mexican Americans, and Chicano activists, Barajas tells a story of intergenerational empathy and collaboration. Focusing on Ventura County, California, Barajas reveals that ethnic Mexicans banded together to support farmworkers, victims of police brutality, antiwar protests, and desegregation efforts. Historians have long centered the Chicano movement in Los Angeles and have shown how national figures like Cesar Chavez inspired urban, Mexican American youth to become Chicanos. Barajas shows us that, in Ventura County, the lines between rural and urban and migrant and native were fluid, and an unsung intergenerational cast was at the forefront of the political campaigns in the region.

Situated only four hours away from the border, Ventura County drew Mexican migrants into its fields and factories. Early on, these migrants formed mutual aid societies, which lobbied public...

You do not currently have access to this content.