Ellen Wayland-Smith's The Angel in the Marketplace offers a highly readable, crisply written account of the career of Jean Wade Rindlaub, one of the most successful women in advertising during the first half of the twentieth century, and one of the most influential ad executives ever. At a time when most ad women were, at best, low-level copywriters, Rindlaub rose to national prominence and upper leadership at prestigious agencies. She was famous for her use of sentimental moments in families’ lives; her ad campaigns were a celebration of normative femininity and “love-and-kisses, heart-tugging domesticity” (6). Rindlaub's work firmly tethered family well-being to consumer goods and to the businesses that produced them; she went out of her way to describe the necessity of American corporations to wives and mothers. Wayland-Smith draws on Rindlaub's professional writings to argue that women played a critical role in consolidating (and defending) American capitalism. Seeking to...

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