“Perhaps the most salient feature of the radical tradition is its ability to weather storms and generate new gusts of energy that can sustain hope in times of despair,” Dan Berger and Emily Hobson write in Remaking Radicalism, a new documentary reader packed with powerful writings from a wide array of late twentieth-century movements for change. “Radicalism is persistent,” they argue, “and its persistence offers many lessons” (1). One important lesson this book offers is that engaging in protest (through organizing, demonstrating, or writing) is in and of itself a generative act, even if it does not bring all the electoral, legislative, or economic gains activists had hoped for.

These “radical” writings from the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s challenge us not to fall into the easy and false belief that there are radical eras and conservative ones and that they somehow do not feed each other. This sweeping collection...

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