This issue reminds us of the best, the worst, and some of the in-between of what worker organization has produced for the labor movement in the United States. Historian David Witwer, distinguished for his historical inquiry of union corruption centered on the Teamsters, first sets a lesser-known story of corrupt unionism—this one the United Auto Workers (UAW) fiefdom under Richard Gosser in Toledo, Ohio, in the 1950s—into broader and longer-term context. As many readers know, in June 2020 former UAW president Gary Jones pled guilty to federal charges and admitted to the misuse of over $1 million in union funds. Such behavior, while almost expected in the era of the Jimmy Hoffa–led Teamsters, casts surprise shade on the UAW, which long basked in an almost Boy Scout–like reputation for honesty and financial rectitude under the leadership of Walter Reuther (1946–70). As Witwer discovers, however, union “corruption” is often in the...

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