While writing this review of Alexis N. Walker's eloquently concise and smartly argued book, I wished that the drafters of the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act had read it before commencing their labors. If the PRO Act manages to win over wavering Democratic senators and somehow avoids another Republican-led filibuster to become law, I fear we will soon find that its reform potential has been undercut by its failure to address the problem Walker outlines so clearly in this volume. And if the PRO Act fails to be enacted, that result will turn in large part on that very same problem: the long-standing bifurcation of American labor law into separate spheres—the private sector and the public sector. This division has hampered labor solidarity ever since the passage of the Wagner Act in 1935, generated frequent opportunities for labor's enemies to whipsaw unions and states against each other, and...

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