In the pantheon of petty American tyrants, Frank Hague (1876–1956) holds a prominent place. In the history of the Great Depression, his name is often used as shorthand for bad bossism and police brutality as workers sought to fashion a new deal for themselves and their families. Donald R. Rogers sets out to provide a historiographical corrective by situating Hague and his legal battles with the Committee for Industrial Organization / Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) within the larger contexts of the era. In Rogers's treatment, Hague remains the recalcitrant bully mayor who used the police to harass, beat, and chase unionists and organizers out of the city. Rogers argues, however, that “the grand economic, political, and legal realities of the 1930s [were] as much responsible for the CIO-Hague conflict as were the mayor's abuses and the CIO-ACLU efforts to stop him” (6)....

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