Most histories of Puerto Rico's diaspora take place in mainland cities like New York or Chicago. With Colonial Migrants at the Heart of Empire, Ismael García-Colón explores how, during the (first) great wave of Puerto Rican migration, the postwar colonial state developed policies and bureaucracies to divert migrants away from the big city and onto American farms. García-Colón's two-part study begins in the policy-making corridors of Washington and San Juan. He retells the origins of Puerto Rico's US-based Migration Division (MD) and its Farm Labor Program (FLP, 1947–93). This historiographical ground is well traveled in more concise fashion by Jorge Duany (Blurred Borders: Transnational Migration between the Hispanic Caribbean and the United States [2011]), and in greater analytical detail by Edgardo Meléndez (Sponsored Migration: The State and Puerto Rican Postwar Migration to the United States [2017]). Garcia-Colón's...

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