In the past twenty years, scholarly interest in anarchism has flourished across the social sciences and especially history. The new histories of anarchism examined the community foundations of movements and often the facilitating role of the press. In doing so, this literature pushed transnational labor and immigration history forward by giving us nuanced understandings of how people became anarchists, how anarchist ideals spread around the world, explanations of why the classical period of anarchism came to an end around World War II, and how these ideals were carried forward to feed new movements as the century wore on.

This literature is inherently transnational and the most developed strands of these new studies consolidate around ethnicity and language. So, for example, we have significant new contributions to the literature on Italian anarchists in Italy and throughout the Americas that built on...

You do not currently have access to this content.