Mary Stanton's history of the Communist Party in Alabama is a modest contribution to the large literature on the party in the United States, racial violence, and movements for equality in the South. Inspired by Flannery O'Connor, that consummate southern storyteller, Stanton offers a highly readable narrative of the Black and white radicals who faced enormous danger and violence trying to create an integrated, more equitable society in the South. Predictably, the Scottsboro case, in which nine young African American men were unjustly accused of rape, occupies an important place in the story. While the enormous national significance of the case emerges clearly, however, its international impact is less clear. Most of the book consists of this and half a dozen other case studies of racist violence and interracial radicalism—the Camp Hill and Reeltown massacres, the Kentucky miners’ strikes, unemployed organizer Angelo Herndon's trial, and a series of lynching cases....

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