At the beginning of the conclusion of Mutinous Memories, Matt Perry links the song “Chanson de Craonne” with the “Odessa Waltz.” Soldiers on the Chemin des Dames in 1917 sang the former when they engaged in a series of mutinies (or “strikes” or “acts of collective indiscipline,” depending on one’s perspective) to demand better treatment and a saner military strategy from their superior officers. The French Army listened, assigning new officers, granting more leave, and providing better living conditions.

Some anonymous sailor or sailors wrote the latter during the incident that interests Perry, the understudied mutinies among the French Black Sea fleet in 1919. Warships, which Mike Davis called “floating factories,” became a microcosm of much of the labor activism, political uncertainty, and international upheaval that accompanied the end of the war in Western Europe (vii). With the war over,...

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