The Red Coast is a self-described “popular history” of labor militancy and political radicalism along the southern Pacific coast of Washington state in the early twentieth century (5). The authors’ approach puts class conflict at the center of the story. Hence, groups that are often depicted in a rise and fall narrative, such as the syndicalist Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), appear as one expression of an underlying radicalism that continued into the 1930s. In fifteen chapters, The Red Coast brings together the history of lumber, maritime, fishing, and waterfront workers, as well as the role of Finnish men and women. The book combines these topics with efforts by business and its allies to combat radicalism, such as criminal syndicalism legislation, immigration restriction, and vigilante violence.

The story of the shingle weavers and their decades-long fight for the six-hour day...

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