In Black Huntington: An Appalachian Story, Cicero M. Fain III tells the story of the founding of Huntington, West Virginia, in the nineteenth century from the perspective of its earliest Black residents. A third-generation Black Huntingtonian, Fain builds on a tradition of African American historians who have told the history of Appalachia, too often rendered as an all-white enclave, through stories of migration, community, and labor of Black people. He joins sociologist Karida Leigh Brown, the daughter of parents who hailed from the coal-mining town of Lynch, Kentucky, who recently published her award-winning book Gone Home: Race and Roots through Appalachia (2018). Fain and Brown build on the works of luminaries like Joe W. Trotter, who published Coal, Class, and Color (1990) about Black coal miners in southern West Virginia, as well as the “father of Black History,” Carter G....

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