The rise of the new labor history in the late twentieth century, with its “bottom up” approach to working-class history, led to a relative neglect of subjects such as US labor’s political relationships with the American state. More recently, transnational labor historians have sought to transcend the state and focus on relationships among workers and unions across national boundaries. Despite these dominant trends in the field, an increasingly rich, albeit too often marginalized, historiography has developed at the borders of labor and US foreign policy history that suggests the significant ways in which trade union leaders helped shape, and were, in turn, shaped by, the Cold War. Although some of the themes in Anthony Carew’s new book will seem familiar to specialists, his meticulous archival research makes this volume the most definitive study to date on the international activities of AFL...

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