Inspired by the June 2019 conference “Global Labor Migration: Past and Present” at Amsterdam’s International Institute for Social History, Labor devotes this issue to a sample of the best of the latest research and writing across a diverse and stimulating field. In the first essay, Lauren Braun-Strumfels returns us to the formative early years of federal immigration control. Following the categorical exclusion of the Chinese in 1882, Congress revised the law to give immigration agents the right to exclude any person “likely to become a public charge,” granting agents broad discretion to invoke what became known as the “LPC clause.” Aside from inspector agency, Braun-Strumfels emphasizes the little-known role of the Italian government itself, with a special office (the only one of its kind) of its own to screen applicants at Ellis Island. Attempting to check outright exclusion of their emigrating...

You do not currently have access to this content.