I begin with a question: How do we define “solidarity” politically and historically? In his book with that word prominently in its title, Steve Striffler rightly recognizes that the term is, at times, difficult to pin down. Its “defining feature,” at least in the case of US activists and Latin Americans, “has been its ideological differentiation, lack of institutional continuity, and inconsistent presence” (5). He acknowledges the difficulty of defining it in any specific moment, for it is a “contested and somewhat vague concept which continues to mean different things to different people who are often advancing quite distinct goals and visions” (16). Context is everything: Solidarity “can be a claim, aspiration, argument, political vision . . . or all of the above and more” (16). Striffler is relatively ecumenical in his book, which includes a large cast of characters, many of whom share little in common with one another,...

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