Adelle Blackett’s Everyday Transgressions has its origins in the 2010 publication of a report by the International Labour Organization (ILO) titled “Decent Work for Domestic Workers,” which she was invited to author as a law professor with expertise in international labor law. The ILO is a UN agency, and in 2011 ILO delegates representing workers, employers, and member state officials passed Convention 189, which for the first time spelled out specific standards applying to domestic work. The ILO also passed Recommendation 201, which gave further guidelines for how the convention’s articles might be enforced in practice. The new standards went into force in September 2013, a year after the convention received two ratifications. As of October 2019, a total of 29 ILO members have ratified the convention.

Everyday Transgressions follows the publication of Jennifer Fish’s Domestic Workers of the World Unite! in 2017, which focused—also from an insider’s perspective—on how...

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