In 1897, hostilities toward Southern and Eastern European immigrants in the anthracite coal fields of eastern Pennsylvania erupted in racial violence. The event, known as the Lattimer Massacre, killed nearly twenty unarmed immigrants and injured dozens more. Today, more than 120 years later, anti-immigration hostilities continue to influence local politics as local whites try to expel Latino residents. Remembering Lattimer is about this legacy of anti-immigration sentiment in eastern Pennsylvania.

Anthropologist Paul Shackel uses a variety of techniques to tell the story of Lattimer and how the event has been remembered. Memory studies provide the foundation for his work, but Shackel also incorporates ethnography and archaeology to demonstrate how the memory of the Lattimer Massacre has shifted. It is, in part, an effort to understand how a community makes sense of its past. This book is also an effort to make Lattimer “part of the national memory,” to help society...

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