Since 1917 itself, Russia’s year of revolutions has been regarded and represented as an annus mirabilis or annus horribilis, depending on one’s viewpoint, with few variations in between. This study aspires to a portrait, from the bottom up, of this state and society in extremis. Rather than focus on high politics or ideology, the author, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, is more interested in the day-to-day tribulations resulting from this war-torn state’s chaotic transition from tsarist regime to two quite different revolutionary regimes. The first, in February, saw a battle of competing class interests that largely helped defer the revolutionary future, while the second, in October, saw the rise of a radically Manichaean polity of more urgent intent. How, this work asks, do a state and a society in chaos react to that crisis over time? What social and political forms does the chaos...

You do not currently have access to this content.