As the emergence of majority-minority cities has garnered an immense amount of public attention in recent years, scholars have increasingly shifted their analysis to examine the intersection of race/ethnicity and immigration within the development of metropolitan regions throughout the United States. Particularly focused on post-WWII America, urban historians have detailed the socioeconomic and political disparities between urban and suburban communities, while immigration scholars have examined the changing demographics and culture of US cities brought about by sharp increases in Latino and Asian migration. Enter Llana Barber’s Latino City, an ambitious work that represents a recent turn in the study of US cities during the postwar era. Merging the fields of urban/suburban and immigration history, Barber looks to Lawrence, Massachusetts, to investigate the intersection of two of the most important developments affecting American cities during the late twentieth century: the decline...

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