Somewhat fortuitously, the otherwise diverse offerings in this issue all illustrate aspects of an evolving service economy, discrete from if necessarily dependent upon a surrounding world of extraction and production. Chronologically, we begin with Hannah Forsyth’s inquiry into the roots and logic of the professions in Broken Hill, an iconic mining town in the western outback of New South Wales, Australia. Reflecting Labor’s interest at once in conceptual innovations in the field as well as the transnational reach of social-economic development, Forsyth’s essay surprisingly suggests how crucial as well as numerous were the ranks of a middle-class population even in a rock-ribbed industrial heartland. With close attention to accountants, engineers, journalists, nurses, and teachers, Forsyth charts the role of a self-denying class that moralized and to a degree tamed capitalist logic even as it advanced and legitimized the accumulation project....

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.