Addie Wyatt—labor organizer, black community organizer, feminist, and minister—lived her life where the lines of race, class, gender, and religion intersect. From the Mississippi Delta to the South Side of Chicago, the Amalgamated Meat Cutters, and the Vernon Park Church of God, Wyatt traversed a landscape that was at once black, white, and interracial; male-dominated labor activism and labor feminism, community organization and workplace union, “worldly” networks and communities of faith. Telling the story of Wyatt requires that her biographer be agile in negotiating these worlds. Biographers and their subjects often come to grief over such conflicting and competing claims for significance and meaning. More challenging yet, working-class lives, even those that are spent in public, leave behind scant and scattered evidence, much of it poorly suited for the intimate task of biography. To understand the story of the Reverend Addie...

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