In 1943, Mildred Scott of Dallas, Texas, joined a newly formed organization: the American Federation of the Physically Handicapped (AFPH). The mission of the AFPH—“Justice,” “Opportunity,” “Unity,” and “Equal Rights”—resonated with Scott. Physically disabled by polio as a child, she grew up feeling “different” and experienced vocational discrimination as a young adult (1). Despite being trained as a teacher, Scott found that the state of her birth, Pennsylvania, barred people with visible disabilities from teaching in public schools. On joining the AFPH, Scott met others with similar histories of prejudice and unfair treatment and contributed to efforts to end “discrimination against the employment of otherwise qualified but physically handicapped applicants” (1). She also rose in the ranks of the AFPH, eventually serving as the association’s national secretary.

Out of the Horrors of War recounts the stories of people like Scott and...

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