Gender and the Jubilee: Black Freedom and the Reconstruction of Citizenship in Civil War Missouri, a five-chapter monograph based largely on public records, military files, and slave narratives, “analyzes political beliefs as expressed through everyday social practices.” “It is through the study of these actions that we can understand the specific ways in which power operated during the Civil War,” the author concludes (5). How power operated in nonslaveholding northern states during the Civil War was one matter but quite another in slaveholding Missouri, a loyal border state, under martial law. There the military authority, or provost marshal system, replaced civic authority in 1861. That military authority was not designed to advance black civil rights, yet it helped African Americans advance toward freedom while gaining rights to testify against whites in legal proceedings and access to a more equitable system...

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