Books that include the word “fate” in their title usually explore some sort of devolution, and this one is no exception. In The Fate of Labour Socialism the devolution takes place during a span of approximately fifteen years—from a high point for the Canadian Left at the Regina Convention in July 1933 to the more moderate message of the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation during the conformist era of World War II and the Cold War.

The Winnipeg General Strike of 1919 had not ended well for Canadian labor or for Canada’s diverse proponents of socialism who had, since the late nineteenth century, been optimistic about the ultimate triumph of their cause. During the 1920s the Left remained ideologically confused and in political disarray, and organized labor in the Dominion experienced the same “lean years” as its counterpart in the United States. The...

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