Polly Reed Myers’s book began, she tells us, with one box in the Boeing Historical Archives. The result is a “micro-level” analysis, organized into case studies, that examines the gendered work culture of the Boeing Corporation between World War II and the dawn of the twenty-first century (8). Myers demonstrates how the shift from World War II–era fraternal welfare capitalism to twenty-first century neoliberalism affected gender equality in large corporations. She argues that Boeing’s corporate culture, which “relied on a fraternal social order that emphasized masculine heterosexual norms,” excluded women and trans people from the Boeing “family” and privileged heterosexual male breadwinners (34). Gender equality was slow to come to Boeing, even after gendered metaphors about the patriarchal corporate “family” gave way to seemingly equitable rhetoric about the company “team” in the late twentieth century. Neoliberalism tended to diminish male workers’...

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