Many of us in labor studies knew Darryl Holter for his work in the 1980s as a labor scholar, educator, and organizer in Wisconsin. In 1991, the UCLA Labor Center offered him a job, and he taught labor and industrial relations there until his life took a different turn when his father-in-law, who owned several struggling auto dealerships in downtown Los Angeles, came down with terminal cancer. At a time of recession in the wake of the 1992 Rodney King beating and riots, with four hundred jobs at stake, Darryl took over the business and helped to build a coalition to revitalize the downtown. Today, the dealerships employ nearly one thousand, and downtown is booming. After his many previous years of protest singing on picket lines, he also rejuvenated his lifelong passion as a singer-songwriter.

Holter produced a CD of his own songs. For a Labor and Working-Class History Association...

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