Joseph A. McCartin offers in this issue a deeply informed, perceptive, at times elegant review of the scholarly assessments of the Wagner Act, stretching from the “postwar celebrants” to the 1970s New Left, from critical legal studies skeptics to the present-day embrace of Christopher L. Tomlins’s prescient 1985 rotten-to-the-core analysis. “In 2010,” McCartin concludes, the act “began to noticeably loosen its grip on the imaginations of labor intellectuals,” and “a consensus has taken shape” around the need for a “new, twenty-first-century Wagner Act.” McCartin too is ready for a new labor law, though he rightly cautions that in the clamor for this or that legislative fix we not forget the necessity for worker mobilization and favorable public opinion before any “significant reform” can be won.1

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In a final section of the essay, McCartin applies “lessons of the last Wagner Act...

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