The 1870s movement to eliminate Chinese prostitution in California inspired white missionaries in urban Chinatowns to establish rescue homes for girls. One of the first was Presbyterian Margaret Culbertson’s Occidental Mission Home for Girls in San Francisco, later renamed Cameron House after the famous Donadina Cameron, Culbertson’s successor. Others soon followed. Shelly D. Ikebuchi provides an in-depth study of the interplay of gender, race, class, and national and international implications by looking at a mission home for Asian women in British Columbia. Although this home was based in Victoria, it served Vancouver and its outlying areas and was similar to other late nineteenth-century Chinese missionary rescue homes.

In 1886 John Vrooman Gardiner and Reverend John Edward Starr of the Methodist Missionary Society (MMS) were determined to save Chinese slave girls and indentured servants. To do so, Starr and Gardiner established the Chinese Rescue Home in Victoria. In 1888 they turned...

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