Henry Ford is best known as the architect of modern mass-production methods. His name is also associated with Fordism’s fitful transformation of workers into middle-class consumers. Heather B. Barrow’s study examines Fordism’s effects on autoworkers in Dearborn, Michigan, the working-class suburb that developed around Ford Motor Company’s River Rouge plant. By 1927, the Rouge had replaced the Highland Park factory where the Model T had been made. Barrow’s book builds on the work of Stephen Meyer III (The Five Dollar Day: Labor, Management, and Social Control in the Ford Motor Company, 1908–1921 [Albany: State University of New York Press, 1981]) and Clarence Hooker (Life in the Shadows of the Crystal Palace, 1910–1927: Ford Workers in the Model T Era [Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1997]) on Ford’s paternalism and Americanization efforts associated with his Sociological...

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