This collection of twelve essays is a welcome addition to the literature on environmental justice. The editors chose contributors grounded in environmental studies, half from literature and creative writing and half from disciplines as varied as journalism, political science, anthropology, history, cultural studies, and sustainable development. The chronology is contemporary, and while the geographic coverage focuses on the United States, there are two pieces on Canada and one on Vietnam. The topics are wide ranging: the transformation of extraction and subsistence landscapes into elite vacation sites in Wisconsin and Utah, fire suppression in the West, ranching in Arizona, coal mining in Canada and West Virginia, climate change in Vietnam, artificial lighting and the night shift, poverty in the South, the rise of Silicon Valley in northern California, and the health and safety of workers in dangerous workplaces.

The book is divided into three sections: “Working for a Living: Class, Justice,...

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