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suspension

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Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2012) 56 (2): 121–167.
Published: 01 October 2012
... suspensions. Understanding Rameau’s doctrine means, in part, retracing the many refinements, revisions, and reversals that it underwent over the course of its author’s career. This article accordingly reconstructs the development of supposition from the Traité de l’harmonie (1722) to the Code de musique...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2003) 47 (2): 225–272.
Published: 01 October 2003
... of its butt-jointed seams, the patterns connected by the much stronger over- lapping joint. Passage (a) also is made up of very brief motivic patterns involving suspension chains, a “learned” device unknown to the ignorant Rosalia or Cousin Michel. It is useful to consider (a) as not directly related...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2003) 47 (2): 305–323.
Published: 01 October 2003
... as the very harmonic bareness of the music was intended to be spiced by multiple passing tones, suspensions, appog- giaturas, trills, anticipations, et cetera. (Richards 1950, 1: 97–98) According to Richards, most of the “embellishments” of the cadential six-four were mere improvised agréments...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2007) 51 (1): 51–83.
Published: 01 April 2007
... The second6 stage consists in adding dissonances to the basic realization. By dissonanze, partimento theory means only one kind of dissonance: the sus- pension. Suspensions can be added to the simple realization either by scan- ning the bass line for appropriate...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2013) 57 (2): 287–320.
Published: 01 October 2013
... example, Johann David Heinichen’s explanation of the various forms of the nine-eight suspension (see Example 1).2 A cursory look at the examples might lead one to the conclusion reached by William J. Mitchell that “although inversion in this meaning...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2000) 44 (1): 100–126.
Published: 01 April 2000
... to lower dominant, or upper dominant to tonic— 102 here as a suspension over the tonic—is it useable, both of course cases where it has no real chordal significance.17 [17] The antithetic chords are IV, II, and VI. II is related to IV through its major third; VI is related to IV through its minor...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2000) 44 (2): 323–379.
Published: 01 October 2000
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2014) 58 (1): 67–77.
Published: 01 April 2014
...). But, by the time Susanna starts singing, Figaro has adopted her characteristic rhythm (mm. 27–30). The shift of his phrases is effected by the learned style repre- sented by the fourth-species suspensions that counterpoint Figaro’s music...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2015) 59 (1): 121–181.
Published: 01 April 2015
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2009) 53 (2): 191–226.
Published: 01 October 2009
... function in the form of the cadential six-four. The latter is preceded by predominants, and the C in m. 121 is a dissonant suspension that requires resolution to the leading tone. Stable 1ˆ in cutler_03 (section) /home/jobs/journals/jmt/j8/2_cutler Wed May...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2013) 57 (1): 119–129.
Published: 01 April 2013
...) of Clara Schumann, Richard Wagner, and Ernst Friedrich Richter (author of a widely used 1853 German harmony text). Mat- tei shows us how that descending scale can create a chain of 2–3 suspensions between alto and soprano, thus cueing the bass to employ the stock parti- mento pattern known as “down...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (1999) 43 (2): 283–314.
Published: 01 October 1999
... follow the rules of first species fairly closely (al- though five successive six-three chords might be considered too many in a row and a seven-note cantus firmus is shorter than what is usually allowed). In Example 2b, the highest part is delayed to create a series of 7-6 suspensions in accord...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2007) 51 (1): 5–49.
Published: 01 April 2007
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2000) 44 (1): 236–249.
Published: 01 April 2000
... repetition in one of the other media. Two simultaneous exact repetitions constitute redundancy, as does a third exact statement in any medium, hence scoring “0”; all further vari- ants, including subsequent synonyms, add meaning and score “1.”A state- ment of difference constitutes contrast by suspense...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2007) 51 (1): 161–186.
Published: 01 April 2007
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2006) 50 (2): 181–210.
Published: 01 October 2006
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2007) 51 (1): 137–159.
Published: 01 April 2007
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2011) 55 (1): 155–160.
Published: 01 April 2011
... live solo rendition of Monk’s theme. Along with devices such as cadential suspensions, phrase elisions, and “structural puns” (multivalent material at the intersection of overlapping formal sections), these concealed motivic parallelisms enable Peterson to make his performance less sharply...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2014) 58 (2): 257–263.
Published: 01 October 2014
... triadic progression, using the metaphor of tonal preparation, suspension, and resolution to describe the staggered diver- gence and convergence of pitch-class and scale-degree identity within the line (Tonality, 78–81). The example powerfully illustrates one way...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2007) 51 (1): 85–135.
Published: 01 April 2007
... the idea of the composer” (“Possono pure avere una nota 5a, e l’altra 9a secondo l’idea del compositore”; ca. 1780s, fol. 17r; see Example 4). The “nine” means a 9–8 suspension, which often required a third over the even-numbered bass notes. In Neapolitan manuscripts, the presence...