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poetic form

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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 6. Ruth Brown, “It's All for You” (1951). ABB´ poetic form and 7,6,5 phrase rhythm, with interior rhymes in the A line (underlined) and refrain fragments, labeled r, in the B lines. (a) Third verse (1:14). (b) Second verse (0:37). More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 15. Ray Charles, “Lonely Avenue” (1956, by Doc Pomus). AB/R(CD/EFr) poetic form and 8,8,6 phrase rhythm. The “Caldonia”-like opening is transposed to the second phrase and the vocal responses fuse with the caesuras. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 18. Chuck Berry, “School Day” (1957). AB/CD/EF poetic form with lines spanning a weak upbeat position and the following strong downbeat position. On the level of the beat the lines stretch across beats 2, 3, 4, and 1 in every weak-strong pair and the instrumental responses have the same More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 19. Chuck Berry, “Johnny B. Goode” (1958). AB/CD/EF poetic form and 8,8,8 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 10. Fats Domino, “Don't Lie to Me” (1951). The “Caldonia” type with AB/R(C/D) poetic form and “asymmetrical” 8,6,5 phrase rhythm. The refrain has a poetic rhyme but no rhythmic rhyme. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 21. Ray Charles, “Greenbacks” (1957, by Renald Richard). Twenty-bar form with AB/CD/EF/R(G/H) poetic form and 8,8,8,5,5 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 9. Fats Domino, “Boogie Woogie Baby” (1950, by Antoine Domino and Dave Bartholomew). The “Caldonia” type with AB/R/R poetic form, and “asymmetrical” 8,6,5 phrase rhythm. The refrain has neither poetic rhyme nor rhythmic rhyme. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 7. Ruth Brown, “Hey Pretty Baby” (1949). The archetypal “Caldonia” variant, with AB/R(C/D) poetic form and 8,5,5 phrase rhythm. The AB couplet spans the first four bars, with a poetic and rhythmic rhyme in positions 4 and 8. The R(CD) refrain couplet falls in the last eight bars More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 23. Willie Dixon, “Hoochie Coochie Man” (1954), sung by Muddy Waters, third verse (1:50). “Payday” type with archetypal 8,8,5,5 phrase rhythm but AB/CD/R/R poetic form. The refrain has a rhythmic rhyme but no poetic rhyme. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 20. Lowell Fulson, “Pay Day Blues” (1961), second verse (0:45). The archetypal sixteen-bar “Payday” variant with AB/CD/R(E/F) poetic form and 8,8,5,5 phrase rhythm. The refrain has both a poetic rhyme and a rhythmic rhyme. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 24. Big Mama Thornton, “Stop A-Hoppin' on Me” (1954, by Freddie Jenkins), second verse (0:26). “Payday” type with AB/CD/R/R poetic form and 8,8,6,5 phrase rhythm. The refrain has neither poetic rhyme nor rhythmic rhyme. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 11. Little Richard, “Long Tall Sally” (1956, Robert Blackwell, Enotris Johnson, and Richard Penniman), second verse (0:16). The “Caldonia” type with AB/R/R poetic form and 8,5,5 phrase rhythm (if one considers the vocables “extra”). The refrain has a rhythmic rhyme but no poetic rhyme. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 8. Big Mama Thornton, “They Call Me Big Mama” (1952, Don Robey and Willie Mae Thornton), fourth verse (1:19). The archetypal “Caldonia” variant, with AB/R(C/D) poetic form and 8,5,5 phrase rhythm. The refrain has both a poetic rhyme and a rhythmic rhyme. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 38. Buddy Holly, “Midnight Shift” (1958, by Jimmy Ainsworth and Earl Lee), third verse (1:03). AB/CD/R(EF) poetic form and 8,8,8 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 22. Ruth Brown, “I Can't Hear a Word You Say” (1959, by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller), second verse (0:36). “Payday” type with archetypal AB/CD/R(E/F) poetic form but 8,8,7,5 phrase rhythm. The refrain has a poetic rhyme but no rhythmic rhyme. There is a two-bar internal expansion More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 26. Willie Dixon, “Dead Presidents” (1963), sung by Little Walter. “Payday” type with AB/CD/R/R(E/F) poetic form and long–long–short–long, 8,8,6,8 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 25. Willie Dixon, “Back Door Man” (1960), sung by Howlin' Wolf. “Payday” type with AB/CD/R(E/F) poetic form and long–long–long–short, 8,8,8,5 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 1. Ma Rainey, “Sleep Talking Blues” (1928), exhibiting the conventional AAB poetic form, 5,5,5 phrase rhythm, call-and-response pattern, caesura placement, harmonic progression, and harmonic rhythm of the standard prewar blues. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 5. Howlin' Wolf, “(Well) That's All Right” (1952), third verse (1:23). (a) ABR—or AA/BB/R—poetic form and 7,7,5 phrase rhythm. (b) Hypothetical version with 5,5,5 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 16. Little Richard, “Tutti Frutti” (1955, Richard Penniman and Dorothy LaBostrie). AB/AB/CD poetic form and 7,7,8 phrase rhythm. The last phrase is “Caldonia”-like, with tonic harmony, a break, and rhymes in positions 4 and 8. More