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phrase rhythm

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Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2023) 67 (2): 285–331.
Published: 01 October 2023
..., Big Mama Thornton, Fats Domino, Chuck Berry, and Little Richard, the main artists explored in this study. ns72@duke.edu Copyright © 2023 by Yale University 2023 rhythm and blues blues variants phrase rhythm poetic form harmonic rhythm in his autobiography   I Am the Blues...
FIGURES | View All (44)
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 5. Howlin' Wolf, “(Well) That's All Right” (1952), third verse (1:23). (a) ABR—or AA/BB/R—poetic form and 7,7,5 phrase rhythm. (b) Hypothetical version with 5,5,5 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 4. Fats Domino, “She's My Baby” (1950, by Antoine Domino and Dave Bartholomew). (a) AAB poetic form and 7,7,7 phrase rhythm with textual extensions shown with dotted underlines. (b) Hypothetical version with 5,5,5 phrase rhythm and no textual extensions. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 19. Chuck Berry, “Johnny B. Goode” (1958). AB/CD/EF poetic form and 8,8,8 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 14. Ruth Brown, “Mend Your Ways” (1953, by Leroy Kirkland and Lincoln Chase), fourth verse (1:26). AB/CD/R(E/F) poetic form and 8,8,7 phrase rhythm. The second phrase replicates the “Caldonia”-like phrase structure and rhyme placement of the first. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 15. Ray Charles, “Lonely Avenue” (1956, by Doc Pomus). AB/R(CD/EFr) poetic form and 8,8,6 phrase rhythm. The “Caldonia”-like opening is transposed to the second phrase and the vocal responses fuse with the caesuras. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 1. Ma Rainey, “Sleep Talking Blues” (1928), exhibiting the conventional AAB poetic form, 5,5,5 phrase rhythm, call-and-response pattern, caesura placement, harmonic progression, and harmonic rhythm of the standard prewar blues. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 16. Little Richard, “Tutti Frutti” (1955, Richard Penniman and Dorothy LaBostrie). AB/AB/CD poetic form and 7,7,8 phrase rhythm. The last phrase is “Caldonia”-like, with tonic harmony, a break, and rhymes in positions 4 and 8. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 2. Ruth Brown, “5-10-15 Hours” (1952, by Rudolph Toombs), exhibiting the conventional AAB poetic form, 5,5,5 phrase rhythm, call-and-response pattern, caesura placement, harmonic progression, and harmonic rhythm of the standard prewar blues. The recording conveys the more urbanized More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 21. Ray Charles, “Greenbacks” (1957, by Renald Richard). Twenty-bar form with AB/CD/EF/R(G/H) poetic form and 8,8,8,5,5 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 38. Buddy Holly, “Midnight Shift” (1958, by Jimmy Ainsworth and Earl Lee), third verse (1:03). AB/CD/R(EF) poetic form and 8,8,8 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 10. Fats Domino, “Don't Lie to Me” (1951). The “Caldonia” type with AB/R(C/D) poetic form and “asymmetrical” 8,6,5 phrase rhythm. The refrain has a poetic rhyme but no rhythmic rhyme. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 26. Willie Dixon, “Dead Presidents” (1963), sung by Little Walter. “Payday” type with AB/CD/R/R(E/F) poetic form and long–long–short–long, 8,8,6,8 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 25. Willie Dixon, “Back Door Man” (1960), sung by Howlin' Wolf. “Payday” type with AB/CD/R(E/F) poetic form and long–long–long–short, 8,8,8,5 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 28. Little Richard, “Ready Teddy” (1956, by John Marascalco and Robert Blackwell), third verse (0:28). “Payday” type with AB/CD/R/R poetic form and long–long–long–long, 8,8,8,8 phrase rhythm. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 9. Fats Domino, “Boogie Woogie Baby” (1950, by Antoine Domino and Dave Bartholomew). The “Caldonia” type with AB/R/R poetic form, and “asymmetrical” 8,6,5 phrase rhythm. The refrain has neither poetic rhyme nor rhythmic rhyme. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 6. Ruth Brown, “It's All for You” (1951). ABB´ poetic form and 7,6,5 phrase rhythm, with interior rhymes in the A line (underlined) and refrain fragments, labeled r, in the B lines. (a) Third verse (1:14). (b) Second verse (0:37). More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 23. Willie Dixon, “Hoochie Coochie Man” (1954), sung by Muddy Waters, third verse (1:50). “Payday” type with archetypal 8,8,5,5 phrase rhythm but AB/CD/R/R poetic form. The refrain has a rhythmic rhyme but no poetic rhyme. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 17. Ray Charles, “I Had a Dream” (1958), second verse (0:42). AB/CD/R(EFr) poetic form and 7,7,5 phrase rhythm. Lines and half lines lie jaggedly across the barlines, and elongated caesuras merge with the vocal responses. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 20. Lowell Fulson, “Pay Day Blues” (1961), second verse (0:45). The archetypal sixteen-bar “Payday” variant with AB/CD/R(E/F) poetic form and 8,8,5,5 phrase rhythm. The refrain has both a poetic rhyme and a rhythmic rhyme. More