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Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2006) 50 (2): 291–301.
Published: 01 October 2006
...Benjamin Steege Myles W. Jackson Harmonious Triads: Physicists, Musicians, and Instrument Makers in Nineteenth-Century Germany MIT Press, 2006: x+395 pp. ($40.00 cloth, $23.00 paper) Matthias Rieger Helmholtz Musicus: Die Objektivierung der Musik im 19. Jahrhundert durch Helmholtz' Lehre...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2020) 64 (1): 137–143.
Published: 01 April 2020
...Alexander Rehding 137 Journal of Music Theory 64:1, April 2020 DOI 10.1215/00222909-8033469 © 2020 by Yale University Jonathan De Souza Music at Hand: Instruments, Bodies, and Cognition Oxford University Press, 2017: xi + 191 pp. ($44.95 cloth) Alexander Rehding Instrumentalists are cyborgs...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2004) 48 (2): 337–354.
Published: 01 October 2004
...Heather Platt Peter H. Smith Expressive Forms in Brahms's Instrumental Music: Structure and Meaning in His Werther Quartet Indiana University Press, 2005: ix+325 pp. ($49.95 cloth) 2004 © Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 2004 Agawu, Kofi. 1997 . “Analyzing Music under...
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Published: 01 April 2023
Figure 10. Page 1 of Novara as an instrumentation-based graph. The instrumentation for each event is listed next to the corresponding vertex. More
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Published: 01 April 2023
Figure 11. Graphs of each of the four pages of Novara based on instrumentation. More
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Published: 01 April 2023
Figure 12. Graph of Novara with edges representing instrumentation-based continuities between events on all pages. More
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Published: 01 April 2023
Figure 13. Graph of Available Forms I with edges representing instrumentation-based continuities between events on all pages. More
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Published: 01 April 2023
Figure 15. Simplified graph of Novara . All events sharing the same instrumentation are represented by a single vertex. All triangles between vertices represent cliques. More
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Published: 01 April 2023
Figure 14. Directed graph of Available Forms I illustrating instrumentation-based continuities and notated linearities between events. More
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2013) 57 (2): 193–243.
Published: 01 October 2013
...Jeffrey DeThorne Correlating particular instrumental colors with pitch chromaticism, three early twentieth-century scholars demonstrate how a methodical use of colorful winds, less colorful strings, and wind-string mixtures informed actual orchestrational practices. After demonstrating how Wagner’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2009) 53 (2): 163–190.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Anna Gawboy The English concertina, invented by the physicist Charles Wheatstone, enjoyed a modest popularity as a parlor and concert instrument in Victorian Britain. Wheatstone designed several button layouts for the concertina consisting of pitch lattices of interlaced fifths and thirds, which he...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2016) 60 (1): 51–88.
Published: 01 April 2016
...Peter H. Smith Schumann's adaptations of eighteenth-century instrumental forms have long been regarded as problematic, as have the works of his late style period of the 1850s. The Cello Concerto op. 129 (composed 1850, published 1854) is a late work based on classical models that has earned a place...
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 13. Ray Charles, “Blackjack” (1954). The “Caldonia” type with “response-and-call” pattern in the first phrase. The instrumental “responses” combine with the pronounced caesuras breaking up each line of the AB couplet. More
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2017) 61 (2): 171–200.
Published: 01 October 2017
... of the two halves of two-part form. Drawing on a corpus of more than seven hundred instrumental works dated 1650–1770, I demonstrate that these two practices arose and functioned independently from each other, increasing in frequency and in length, before being subsumed into an overarching rotational...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2018) 62 (1): 1–39.
Published: 01 April 2018
... in generalized fretboard space. Musical examples in the essay involve guitar, mandolin, banjo, and ukulele, with extended analyses of pieces by Eddie Van Halen and Mark O’Connor. This investigation, with its blend of formalization and performance analysis, is framed by reflections on space, instruments...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2009) 53 (1): 137–162.
Published: 01 April 2009
... rise to the instrument's rhythmic complexity. Drawing upon these permutational relationships, this study analyzes excerpts from bluegrass banjo repertoire in terms of the connections among rhythmic patterns rendered as beat-class sets. Last, it examines the interaction between these sets and metric...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2015) 59 (2): 191–234.
Published: 01 October 2015
...Stephen C. Brown Starting in the late 1960s Shostakovich used twelve-tone rows in many of his most significant compositions. These rows usually occur melodically within individual vocal or instrumental parts and function as part of a larger musical fabric that does not otherwise involve twelve-tone...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2023) 67 (2): 285–331.
Published: 01 October 2023
...Example 13. Ray Charles, “Blackjack” (1954). The “Caldonia” type with “response-and-call” pattern in the first phrase. The instrumental “responses” combine with the pronounced caesuras breaking up each line of the AB couplet. ...
FIGURES | View All (44)
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Published: 01 April 2024
Figure 1. Steinbeck's example 1.1, a transcription of the opening of “Ornette,” by the Roscoe Mitchell Sextet. NB: all instruments notated at transposing pitch, though discussed in the main text at concert pitch. Initials to the left of each stave indicate the players. More
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Published: 01 October 2023
Example 18. Chuck Berry, “School Day” (1957). AB/CD/EF poetic form with lines spanning a weak upbeat position and the following strong downbeat position. On the level of the beat the lines stretch across beats 2, 3, 4, and 1 in every weak-strong pair and the instrumental responses have the same More