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Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2012) 56 (1): 1–52.
Published: 01 April 2012
...Dmitri Tymoczko This article relates two categories of music-theoretical graphs, in which points represent notes and chords, respectively. It unifies previous work by Brower, Callender, Cohn, Douthett, Gollin, O’Connell, Quinn, Steinbach, and myself, while also introducing new models of voice...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2019) 63 (2): 167–207.
Published: 01 October 2019
... -, and OP -spaces of two- and three-note chords. The final section of the study shows that, although the discrete mod-7 versions of these lattices appear quite different from their continuous mod-12 counterparts, the topological space underlying each of these graphs depends solely on the number of notes...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2009) 53 (1): 1–56.
Published: 01 April 2009
...Scott Murphy The metric cube is a kind of graph of meters proposed as a complement to the types of metric spaces that have already been put forth in music-theoretic scholarship, particularly by Richard Cohn. Whereas Cohn's most recent kind of metric space (2001) can compare meters only...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2002) 46 (1-2): 127–151.
Published: 01 October 2002
... ratios and patterns crop up in both tonal and temporal domains our suspicions are naturally aroused— could the recurrence of a 2–2–1–2–2–2–1 pattern be a sign of some deep parallel between scales and meters? In a word, no. In the following pages I will present spatial representa- tions—graphs...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2005) 49 (1): 1–43.
Published: 01 April 2005
...) series, T8–T3. Arrows labeled T4 or T8 extend from the open square-shaped notehead to the open dia- mond-shaped notehead in each graph. Arrows labeled T9 or T3 extend from the open diamond notehead to the open triangle notehead. Inversions are extendable between each of the open noteheads...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2001) 45 (1): 162–169.
Published: 01 April 2001
... arpeggiations to pro- vide support. In some of the graphs in Volumes I–II, the Urlinie does not consist of a single descending line. It may contain a rising and falling third, as in No. 7 of Bach’s Twelve Short Preludes (I, 58) or “two linear progressions and in the course of which the ∞ can be seen...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2007) 51 (2): 211–243.
Published: 01 October 2007
... of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.” 19th-Century Music 15 : 188 -206. ____. 1992b . “Metric and Hypermetric Dissonance in the Menuetto of Mozart's Symphony in G minor, K. 550.” Integral 6 : 1 -33. ____. 2001 . “Complex Hemiolas, Ski-Hill Graphs and Metric Spaces.” Music Analysis 20 : 295 -326...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2014) 58 (1): 79–101.
Published: 01 April 2014
... common ground. Nonetheless, I wonder if a Cohnian search for correlations between consonant verticalities and voice-leading distance, but with a broader aperture that differentiates between octave-equivalent pitches, could yield more than just vastly bigger graphs. Whereas what Cohn means...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2014) 58 (2): 179–233.
Published: 01 October 2014
..., and Transformations , ed. Douthett Jack Hyde Martha M. Smith Charles J. , 72 – 106 . Rochester, NY : University of Rochester Press . Douthett Jack Steinbach Peter . 1998 . “ Parsimonious Graphs: A Study in Parsimony, Contextual Transformations, and Modes of Limited Transposition...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2019) 63 (2): 231–260.
Published: 01 October 2019
... that can be modeled in principle by conventional meter signatures. Cohn s (2001) ski-hill graphs contain meters that share a constant span; dis- tance is measured in units of hemiola. London s (2012) Zeitnetz is a subgraph of Cohn s ski hill that eliminates pulses too fast or too slow to be entrained...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2001) 45 (2): 483–487.
Published: 01 October 2001
... and explain their function (prolongation or connection). Chapter 5. “Tonal Structure” begins with a presentation of basic sym- bols used in Schenkerian graphs: filled noteheads, unstemmed and with stems of varying lengths used to indicate levels of structure, and half notes2 to indicate notes...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2000) 44 (1): 1–43.
Published: 01 April 2000
.... An example from C. P. E. Bach illustrates this point. Ex. 1 presents the first part of Bach’s Sonatine nuove, no. 4. Two inter- pretations of the melodic diminution in mm. 1–2 appear in ex. 2. In both analyses, B≤ functions as the main structural pitch on the second beat of m. 1. The first graph, however...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2007) 51 (2): 277–332.
Published: 01 October 2007
... semitones, 2π semitones, or x semitones for any value of 0x. Figure 8 graphs5 the magnitude of P with respect to x-cycles as x varies from 1.5 to 15. (The derivation of graphs such as this will be(15 covered, .5) in §3.2.) As expected, since...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2005) 49 (1): 181–188.
Published: 01 April 2005
... category of opus-specific relationships. Unfortunately, one problematic feature of the book is brought espe- cially to the fore in this chapter: a tendency to describe verbally voice- leading matters that are clearly set out in the graphs. Although I find unconvincing Schenker’s later...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2004) 48 (2): 219–294.
Published: 01 October 2004
.... This constitutes a “statics” of scalar collections. Section II turns to “dynamics”—techniques of mov- ing between scales based on shared subsets or efficient voice leading. It presents graphs depicting common-tone and voice-leading relations among familiar scales, one of which is a three-dimensional Tonnetz...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (1999) 43 (1): 101–133.
Published: 01 April 1999
..., descending linear progres- sions, reaching over, motion from an inner voice, unfolding, substitution, descending register transfer, or coupling in middleground graphs deriv- ing from background octave lines. While this does not prove that the aforesaid transformations are impossible, one may well be left...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2008) 52 (2): 251–272.
Published: 01 October 2008
... even n-note chord, for n ranging from 1 to 6.9 (Terminological note: I refer to these as the “doubled subsets of the perfectly even n-note set-class10 Associ- ated to each graph is one of the six Fourier components. For any three-note set-class, the magnitude of its nth Fourier component...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2013) 57 (2): 245–286.
Published: 01 October 2013
... calls ski-hill graphs. Figure 5 provides the ski-hill graph that models the conflicting levels of 2 against 3 in m. 235 of Brahms’s Violin Sonata op. 78, i (shown in Example 3).8 While the entire measure lasts the full dotted whole note represented at the top of the ski-hill graph—Cohn calls...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (1999) 43 (1): 135–163.
Published: 01 April 1999
... of what Krebs says and graphs concerns Schubert’s unproblematic use of F≥ minor as a pivot chord balanced between the two keys. But in order to push the idea of tonal pairing further, he identifies a four-note configuration consisting of an E major triad plus C≥ appoggiatura as rep- resenting “a union...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2014) 58 (2): 257–263.
Published: 01 October 2014
... graphs that reflect the orientation intrinsic to tonal hear- Journal of Music Theory  58:2, Fall 2014 DOI 10.1215/00222909-2781789  © 2014 by Yale University 257 258 JOURNAL of MUSIC THEORY ing. The book’s analytical chapters (chaps. 4–7), as well...