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enharmonic

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Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2005) 49 (1): 141–180.
Published: 01 April 2005
... enharmonic dissonance that Rousseau detected in the passage is based on the flexibility of singing voices, which simply cannot be reproduced on keyboard instruments with their fixed and limited pitches. Or is there more to enharmonicism? Is it an effect that works only in vocal music, or can...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2014) 58 (2): 179–233.
Published: 01 October 2014
... International Conference, MCM 2007 , ed. Klouche Timour Noll Thomas , 406 – 11 . Berlin : Springer . Harrison Daniel . 2002 . “ Nonconformist Notions of Nineteenth-Century Enharmonicism .” Music Analysis 21/2 : 115 – 60 . Hauptmann Moritz . 1853 . Die Natur der Harmonik...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2009) 53 (2): 163–190.
Published: 01 October 2009
... of unequal temperament that yielded two different pitches for these enharmonic pairs. The precise nature of the concertina’s early temperament is discussed in greater detail below, after a look at the practical aspects of the concertina’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2020) 64 (2): 241–281.
Published: 01 October 2020
... enharmonic equivalence and has the same mathematical structure as Jack Douthett s (2008: 82 88) seven-in-twelve filtered point symmetry and Jason Yust s (2015) fractional pitch classes (Fig- ure 1d). The latter highlights signature transformation s underlying corre- spondence with traditional pitch classes...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2002) 46 (1-2): 127–151.
Published: 01 October 2002
... will show that pitch/pitch-class space and an analogous “meter/tempo space” are fundamentally non-isomorphic. This non- isomorphism stems from the fact that there are no temporal analogs to octave and enharmonic equivalence and that there are no tonal analogs to various limits on our temporal perception...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2001) 45 (2): 233–261.
Published: 01 October 2001
...). Lewin, David. 1984 . “Amfortas's Prayer to Titurel and the Role of D in Parsifal: The Tonal Spaces of the Drama and the Enharmonic C♭/B.” 19th-Century Music 7/3 : 336 -49. Monelle, Raymond. 1982 . “Levels of Rhythm in Vocal Music.” British Journal of Aesthetics 22 : 17 -36. Newlin, Dika...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2001) 45 (1): 31–71.
Published: 01 April 2001
... of P9. This effects a mechanical enlargement: the second pitch of the opening string actuates a literal transposition of the same string. G≥4, the third note of the open- ing string, is now “due.” Although the third section does begin with A≤4 (enharmonically the same pitch), it features R2 rather...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2015) 59 (1): 121–181.
Published: 01 April 2015
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2014) 58 (2): 257–263.
Published: 01 October 2014
.../sdint model. The emphasis on the music-psychological aspects of the transformational model is reflected in Rings’s terminology: throughout he uses chroma to refer to the aspect of tone reflected by mod 12 pitch-class notation (i.e., color without regard for enharmonic spelling) and qualia...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2014) 58 (2): 235–256.
Published: 01 October 2014
... with intonation behind. He accepted the fact of enharmonic equivalence as a phenomenal matter but continued to hold to the distinctness of differently named members of the same equal-temperament-equivalent pitch class be- cause of the differing paths by which...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2000) 44 (2): 451–485.
Published: 01 October 2000
... that is enharmonically equivalent to a dom- inant seventh. So the D≤ turns out to be an incomplete neighbor above C, the dominant of the main key. But before the D≤ descends to C there is a voice exchange, and so a B≤ is interpolated between D≤ and C.5 Example 2c shows that the bass of mm. 1–38 enlarges the bass...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2006) 50 (2): 211–251.
Published: 01 October 2006
...- example is misplaced an eighth note early. stein 1989, passim (which couples tonal and hypermetric factors in an analysis of musical parentheses); Brown 1993, 136; and Goldenberg 2001 (which focuses on enharmonic reinterpretation). 216 Journal...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (1999) 43 (2): 231–255.
Published: 01 October 1999
..., arrives in m. 4 (where the melody outlines an A≤ minor triad enharmon- ically spelled) which then moves to A7 (≤II) in m. 5. Example 3 shows the incomplete Ursatz that emerges when we con- tinue the harmonic analysis. In this case we acknowledge A≤ as support for C≤, 3,ˆ even though the bimodal...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2020) 64 (1): 63–103.
Published: 01 April 2020
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2006) 50 (2): 253–275.
Published: 01 October 2006
.... obstinate progressions by major second and by perfect fifth 16  Compare Schubert’s nearly accomplished ascent of leading to the enharmonic equivalent of tonic were pre- three major seconds from tonic (A–B–CD in “Minona” sented in music treatises of Schubert’s era, their complete (1815...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2019) 63 (2): 167–207.
Published: 01 October 2019
... space can be imagined as a number line (Figure 1). The discrete version (pitch) contains elements that correspond to infinitely many note names, or keys on an imaginary piano that spans an infinitude of octaves.3 As is conventional in set theory, pitch space assumes enharmonic equivalence. Continuous...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2012) 56 (1): 53–86.
Published: 01 April 2012
...—a root position major tonic with 3ˆ in the uppermost voice—gives emphasis to ♮ ♮ the significant shift from 3ˆ to ♭3ˆ (G to G♭) on the foreground level, enabling ♯ a seamless enharmonic reinterpretation...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2009) 53 (2): 191–226.
Published: 01 October 2009
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2002) 46 (1-2): 364–368.
Published: 01 October 2002
... chromatic. Nor is F≥ unique. C≥,as the major third in VI≥, cannot be derived from a C scale unless we regard it as an enharmonic clone of ≤II, an idea Schenker, however, doesn’t ever consider. As his annotations indicate, Schenker even describes A≤ major, which is leitereigen to C minor, as chromatic...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2002) 46 (1-2): 347–363.
Published: 01 October 2002
... chromatic. Nor is F≥ unique. C≥,as the major third in VI≥, cannot be derived from a C scale unless we regard it as an enharmonic clone of ≤II, an idea Schenker, however, doesn’t ever consider. As his annotations indicate, Schenker even describes A≤ major, which is leitereigen to C minor, as chromatic...