1-20 of 72 Search Results for

arrow

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2005) 49 (1): 1–43.
Published: 01 April 2005
...) series, T8–T3. Arrows labeled T4 or T8 extend from the open square-shaped notehead to the open dia- mond-shaped notehead in each graph. Arrows labeled T9 or T3 extend from the open diamond notehead to the open triangle notehead. Inversions are extendable between each of the open noteheads...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2009) 53 (2): 227–254.
Published: 01 October 2009
... to be a broad project: modeling “directed measurement, distance, or motion” in an unspecified range of musical spaces. Lewin illustrates this general ambition with an equally general graph—the simple arrow or vector shown in Figure 1. This diagram, he writes, “shows two points s and t...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2014) 58 (2): 179–233.
Published: 01 October 2014
... GTSs,” but I prefer a metaphoric designation: plane dance.25 The plane dance is a planar graph consisting of nodes and arrows representing the fundamental GTSs and the commatic transitions, respectively. Obviously, each node of this regu- lar...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2006) 50 (1): 111–127.
Published: 01 April 2006
... network, this one requires verbal gloss to communicate fully. We will begin by discussing the node contents, before moving on to the arrows and the network structure. The nodes contain the words “Theory,” “Interpretation,” and “Method- ology...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2004) 48 (1): 99–141.
Published: 01 April 2004
...) = y, 10 T4(G) = B, and I5(C) = F. The first expression can be rewritten with arrows in the form f: x→y, which is read “f maps x to y, or “the rule f assigns y to x.” The latter expressions can be rewritten as T4: G→B, I5: C→F. When referring to a mapping between sets one...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2005) 49 (2): 277–299.
Published: 01 October 2005
..., that is, two bass notes followed by a midrange chord. To follow a notation developed by Brown (1986, 122–33), I add a left-pointing arrow above the 3 on the backbeat line to signify that the march rhythm is to be disrupted by the inclusion of a three-group. That is, the bass notes and chords...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2005) 49 (2): 209–239.
Published: 01 October 2005
... snare drum accents. This pattern, depicted by the upward- pointing vertical arrows beamed under the lower staff, continues through m. 4. Although Adderley at first seems not to respond to the off-beat figure, Hayes’s determined iteration of the pattern eventually prompts...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2015) 59 (2): 273–320.
Published: 01 October 2015
... of an interval pattern to a different position (or location) related by affinity in the diatonic scale.13 In Figure 2.3, solid transpositio arrows exemplify the recurrence of p, (F, 0) → (C, 0) → (G, 0) → (D, 0), or 14...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2011) 55 (1): 1–41.
Published: 01 April 2011
... iterations than its predecessor, as indicated by the boxed integers. Therefore, the entire tenor line in mm. 1–3 after R9 can be expressed as shown on line (d) as a retrograded iteration over another iteration over the powers of STEPS on a single pitch class. Arrows and boxed integers...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2022) 66 (1): 135–145.
Published: 01 April 2022
..., in the specific form of subscripted transpositions ( T 1 , T –2 ) labeling arrows connecting musical events. (Lehman's boldface sets into relief transformational abbreviations.) (4) In showing how a stepwise modulation shifts mood, it introduces the connection between structure and affect. (5) It demonstrates...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2014) 58 (2): 257–263.
Published: 01 October 2014
... Unlike the now iconic example 0.1 from GMIT, in which an interval i extends as an arrow from point s to point t, my sonic image of 2  Lewin (2006, 91) discusses the illusion and the problems surrounding the hearing of “dubbits.” 262 JOURNAL of MUSIC THEORY point s...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2013) 57 (1): 159–191.
Published: 01 April 2013
... with pomorphic agents, such as a “phantasmic and elusive differently shaded dots and show their (potential) voice chord [that] . . . exerts its influence on twelve-tone equal-­ leading with arrows. As he explains, the benefits of sim- tempered music” (60), or a “symmetrical chord [that] plicity...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2020) 64 (2): 241–281.
Published: 01 October 2020
... and la are third related (see the discussion of Table 5).24 Therefore transpositions in the Impromptu nearly exhaust all coordinated trans position types within common-practice music. 23 The resulting transformations depend on arrow place- ment and direction. In Example 8 the choice of arrow place- ment...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2005) 49 (1): 109–140.
Published: 01 April 2005
... Interpretations Let us now take a second look at the sequences, but from a transforma- tional perspective. Example 6 reproduces the sketches from Examples 1b and 2b. I have added arrows and labels for the transformations. Example 6a is a sketch of the earlier, parsimonious sequence, and Example 6b...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2013) 57 (2): 321–371.
Published: 01 October 2013
... of the hierarchical relations between the four agent classes and then move on to explore how these relations permit transfers of agency from one locus to another. 3.1 A hierarchy of nested agencies Figure 1 stacks the four agent classes, from the bottom up, in the order just discussed; vertical arrows...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2016) 60 (2): 181–212.
Published: 01 October 2016
... collections in the same terms: a unison, the chromatic scale, the whole-tone scale, a diminished-seventh chord, an augmented triad, a chord of fourths, and the tritone, then the inversional forms of these collections in reverse order. He drew arrows...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2004) 48 (1): 69–98.
Published: 01 April 2004
...). Arrows indicate motivic changes that occur as the result of a shape or interval alteration, denoted by an X in the example. The abbre- viation NC (“no change”) is used when an element remains unaltered. In the shape transmutation, the shape of the motive changes from a smooth contour to a jagged...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2005) 49 (1): 45–108.
Published: 01 April 2005
...-class n tips the balance toward n o’clock. To model the force it exerts on the balance, then, we can use an arrow of unit length oriented to point toward n o’clock. We will name such arrows a(n), and refer to the unit of force or length that they represent as a lewin, abbreviated Lw...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2000) 44 (2): 323–379.
Published: 01 October 2000
...-schematic structure in these schemas is represented by double arrows in Figure 1. Each musical schema serves as a template upon which can be mapped the concrete pat- terns of a musical work. Correspondences between concrete pattern and musical schema yield generic-level metaphorical meanings, which...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2008) 52 (2): 251–272.
Published: 01 October 2008
..., 1 0, 1, 1 E, G) (B, E, G≥) is the same as (E, G, C) (E, G≥, B). The numbers above the arrows represent paths in pitch-class space, or directed distances such as “up two semitones,” “down seven semitones,” “up thirteen...
Includes: Supplementary data