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arpeggiation

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Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2017) 61 (1): 29–57.
Published: 01 April 2017
...Diego Cubero The concept of prolongation in Schenkerian analysis broadly describes the elaboration of a vertical sonority. Among the most basic ways to prolong a chord is by arpeggiating it, such that it governs the time span of its arpeggiation. In Heinrich Schenker's writings, however...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2002) 46 (1-2): 207–283.
Published: 01 October 2002
...-pitch perception. Such aspects include the nonsimultaneous presentation of pitches, i.e., arpeggiation, and octave equivalence. Arpeg- giated harmonies are associated with the corresponding block chords and roots thereof, although an arpeggiation (usually)13 evokes no virtual pitch. As for octave...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (1999) 43 (1): 101–133.
Published: 01 April 1999
... of the Ursatz, those with octave lines are not susceptible to interruption.4 They also admit no first order neighbor notes, and (contrary to what one might expect) Schenker says they offer no special opportunities for mixture.5 Furthermore, Schenker neither dis- cusses nor illustrates first-order arpeggiation...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2001) 45 (2): 483–487.
Published: 01 October 2001
... from the classical liter- ature. These concepts include the use of chord inversions to create bass arpeggiations, leaps in the bass in connection with bass arpeggiations, elaboration by means of neighboring and passing motion (and the possi- bility of accompanying contrapuntal chords...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (1999) 43 (2): 257–281.
Published: 01 October 1999
... part, which contains the stable lower voice. Example 5b shows the voice leading including the structural bass notes. The soprano arpeggiates twice from G1 to B≤2. In the first case the tonic returns on G2, before the arpeggiation is complete. In the second case the arpeggiation is accelerated, so...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2001) 45 (1): 31–71.
Published: 01 April 2001
...- tural situations: initial ascent to the primary tone; arpeggiation to the pri- mary tone; embedded descents at multiple levels (idea, theme, section, movement); and neighbor-note (or adjacency) motions. We might posit an additional category that commonly arises in analytical practice, the quirky...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2005) 49 (1): 181–188.
Published: 01 April 2005
... procedures that produce triadic unfolding: linear (step- wise) motion and chordal (arpeggiated) motion. Commonalities, in other words, necessarily and automatically, link all pieces subjected to such analysis. So at what point, then, can one claim, as does Beach, that a work’s voice leading...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2005) 49 (2): 301–332.
Published: 01 October 2005
.... In the chorus of “Armageddon,” mm. 3–5 (Table 3c), a progression from tonic (B≤m7) to subdominant (E≤7) is divided in the foreground by a chromatic chord: B≤m7 G≤7 E≤7. In “Prince of Darkness,” mm. 1–7 (Example­­ 5), the bass roots arpeggiate the G-minor tonic triad with parallel structures on each...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2014) 58 (2): 235–256.
Published: 01 October 2014
...- mittently, to keys, and the latter to higher-level chords—but either these are purely conceptual in nature (in the way a melodically arpeggiated chord is not) or the basis for their inference is extratheoretical (again, in the way a linear progression is not).1 The neo-Riemannians may claim, of course...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2001) 45 (1): 119–143.
Published: 01 April 2001
...—is an inviting analytical perspec- tive, since this relationship extends beyond the themes themselves in shaping the course of the movement. The second theme may be under- stood to derive from the first roughly by inversion—by a reversal of the direction of its opening arpeggiation. Following a second...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2016) 60 (1): 89–95.
Published: 01 April 2016
... established to this point is the initial com- posing out of the Naturklang by means of descending stepwise motion coun- terpointed by an arpeggiation through the fifth. But there are five diatonic modes in which such a composing out is possible (diatonic in present-day...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2001) 45 (1): 162–169.
Published: 01 April 2001
... arpeggiations to pro- vide support. In some of the graphs in Volumes I–II, the Urlinie does not consist of a single descending line. It may contain a rising and falling third, as in No. 7 of Bach’s Twelve Short Preludes (I, 58) or “two linear progressions and in the course of which the ∞ can be seen...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2009) 53 (2): 191–226.
Published: 01 October 2009
... underpinnings (Example 4). After a chromatic voice exchange connects the opening tonic to the minor dominant in mm. 15–23, Brahms unfolds the major dominant through upper-voice passing motions and bass arpeggiation. As the lovers draw...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2002) 46 (1-2): 364–368.
Published: 01 October 2002
... harmonies but in the coincidental confluences of melodic lines. The bass, in particular, moves from I through III to V before returning to I at the beginning of the reprise, a large-scale arpeggiation of the tonic that Schenker equates with Tonalität. The crucial moments in this long-range...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2002) 46 (1-2): 347–363.
Published: 01 October 2002
.... The bass, in particular, moves from I through III to V before returning to I at the beginning of the reprise, a large-scale arpeggiation of the tonic that Schenker equates with Tonalität. The crucial moments in this long-range elaboration of the tonic coincide with the main formal divisions...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2023) 67 (1): 141–169.
Published: 01 April 2023
... gently interrupts one of the guest's questions (0:14:33), at which point a soft electronic timbre begins to arpeggiate a D♭-minor triad. Not only does the root of this harmony match the continuing pedal, but also the pulse of the arpeggiation moves eight times as fast as the pedal, the same rate...
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Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2004) 48 (1): 25–68.
Published: 01 April 2004
... diatonic arpeggiation that clears away the chromatically trou- bled grief (not indicated in the sketch) of the structure proper. Such an approach to the outward expression of inner-voice as metaphor for inner life may also be embodied within the interior of a structure, particularly in an introspective...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (1999) 43 (2): 283–314.
Published: 01 October 1999
... the arpeggiation) is to resolve the top note down by step. To move with such a sense of purpose to an active tone can be heard as an expression of strength. (At the begin- ning of the guitar-trio performance, the arpeggiation contains tones more active than the top note, and this leads to a different affect...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (2000) 44 (1): 236–249.
Published: 01 April 2000
... and the text, normally covering only a chorus or bridge) and analytical reductions (not necessarily of a longer span, but closer to the background level and with only bar numbers and no words), he uses beams in the bass to show movement by cycle of 5ths rather than doctri- naire Ursatz arpeggiation...
Journal Article
Journal of Music Theory (1999) 43 (1): 135–163.
Published: 01 April 1999
... as arpeggiating either the C≥-minor or the E-major triad” (p. 19). This is forced, since the E4-G≥3 frame of the descending motion, along with the replacement of B≥3 (the third of the previous G≥ dominant) with BΩ3 , pulls the music resolutely back to E, the primary tonic, where the song then closes. Whatever...