embodiment has become a near-ubiquitous analytic frame across humanities scholarship, including in music studies. Embodiment's appeal to music analysts is clear: it promises to ground analysis in relational modes of engagement rather than in objective universals, it gives analysts new tools for describing and explaining phenomena like timbre or affect that traditionally have been low analytic priorities, and it potentially broadens analytic discourse by incorporating non-Western epistemologies.1 Because embodiment has become so pervasive in music scholarship, the concept risks becoming so flexible and so capacious that it could lose much of its explanatory value. Conversely, embodiment—and especially “the body”— may risk becoming a universalizing framework of its own, of the very sort that early interventions into bodily musical experience grounded in feminist thought were trying to challenge. In either case, scholars enthusiastic about the study of the intersections of music and the body must take pains to avoid assuming...

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