WHAT HAPPENS WHEN music analysis centers on the perspectives of performers? The question is one of several running through the analyses of twentieth-century repertory collected in theorist-pianist Daphne Leong's compelling new book, Performing Knowledge: Twentieth-Century Music in Analysis and Performance. At the heart of the book are eight analyses and one experiment—each coauthored with a different performer (or composer)—that Leong uses to explore the boundaries between performance and analysis, to document the transmission of practice between performers, to underline the value of analysis in cultures of performance pedagogy, to test audience response to cues introducing an unfamiliar work, and to tell compelling stories about the pieces of music given chapter-length treatment in the book. The musical stories Leong and her collaborators tell—anchored in analysis of notation, recordings, and the testimony of performers—cover a broad range, including metric and contrapuntal process, the unifying effects of voice leading, and the sometimes...

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