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peranakan

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Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1988) 47 (3): 503–517.
Published: 01 August 1988
... and Overseas Chinese Assimilation in Southeast Asian Countries. ” Revue du Sud-est Asiatique 2 : 67 – 84 . van den Berg L. W. C. 1887 . De Inlandsche Rangen en Titels op Java en Madoera [The indigenous ranks and titles in Java and Madura]. Batavia : Landsdrukkerij . Javanese, Peranakan...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1983) 42 (2): 460–461.
Published: 01 February 1983
...Mary F. Somers Heidhues Peranakan Chinese Politics in Java . By Leo Suryadinata . Rev. ed. Singapore : Singapore University Press for the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies , 1981 . xvii , 193 pp. Select Bibliography, Index. $30 (cloth); $20(paper). Copyright © Association...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1990) 49 (4): 1012–1013.
Published: 01 November 1990
...Robert L. Winzeler The Baba of Melaka: Culture and Identity in a Chinese Peranakan Community in Malaysia . By Tan Chee Beng . Selangor (Malaysia) : Pelandok Publications , 1988 . xxii, 297 pp. Copyright © The Association for Asian Studies, Inc. 1990 1990 1012 THE JOURNAL OF ASIAN...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1984) 43 (2): 247–272.
Published: 01 February 1984
...Ellen Rafferty Abstract The linguistic history of the Chinese of Java sketched here focuses on two periods of creative linguistic effort by the Chinese in the development of varieties of Malay/Indonesian. The first period is from 1880–1910, when the Peranakan Chinese—together with Dutch...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1961) 20 (3): 353–362.
Published: 01 May 1961
... homeland had been lost or corrupted in the Indonesian environment"? These questions concern the "Peranakan" Chinese, who constituted the overwhelming majority of Chinese in Java as of the late nineteenth century. "Peranakan" is an Indonesian term which in this context refers to local-born Chinese who...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (2005) 64 (1): 261–262.
Published: 01 February 2005
... of Terengganu, who represent a mere 3.38 percent of the state s population. Tan Chee-Beng identi es two categories of Chinese in Terengganu: the acculturated Chinese and the less-acculturated or more purely Chinese (a group about whom we do not learn in this study). Unlike the Baba, Straits, or Peranakan...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1980) 40 (1): 204–208.
Published: 01 November 1980
... contention is that previous studies have contributed to gross categorizations and shallow perceptions of Indonesia's Chinese. In Indonesia, there is a major division between the peranakan and the totok Chinese. In the past these two groups have coexisted, and to a lesser extent they still do, as distinct...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1983) 42 (2): 459–460.
Published: 01 February 1983
..., Australia The views expressed are those of the reviewer and should not be attributed to the Office of National Assessments. Peranakan Chinese Politics in Java. By LEO SURYADINATA. Rev. ed. Singapore: Singapore University Press for the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 1981. xvii, 193 pp. Select...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1964) 24 (1): 75–90.
Published: 01 November 1964
... presented British census takers at this time with considerable difficulties of classification. 5 Ibid. See p. 81 for a discussion of the term “Arab” in this context. 6 Ibid. “Jawi Peranakan” (“local-born Muslims”) were the offspring of South Indian Muslim and Malay unions (see p. 86 and n...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1984) 43 (2): 215–216.
Published: 01 February 1984
.../Indonesian. The first period is from 1880 1910, when the Peranakan Chinese together with Dutch and Eurasians who were writing in Malay at the time developed a literary language from Low Malay that was primarily an oral language with many regional and social variants. Soon after this period, the Dutch...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1988) 47 (3): 473.
Published: 01 August 1988
... of ideas and more of an advocate of viewpoints that did not long survive the late Ming than a "pioneering ancestor" of scholarly trends in the Qing. MASON C. HOADLEY employs the concepts of ethnic boundaries and the facility for movement across them to consider relations between Javanese, peranakan...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1982) 41 (3): 639–640.
Published: 01 May 1982
... largest temples are still controlled by the Gongguan (Chinese Council), a plethora of special temples has appeared, organized by working-class Chinese. These temples meet a diversity of needs related to the spread of peranakanization, the Sinicization of Indonesians, and foreign-derived monotheism...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1990) 49 (4): 1010–1012.
Published: 01 November 1990
... and Identity in a Chinese Peranakan Community in Malaysia. By T A N C H E E B E N G . Selangor (Malaysia): Pelandok Publications, 1988. xxii, 297 pp. Tan Chee Beng's study of the Baba (also Peranakan or Straits) Chinese of Melaka is based on extensive fieldwork conducted in the late nineteen-seventies...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1977) 36 (4): 796.
Published: 01 August 1977
... is: Certainly, and in at least two respects. First is the existence of the peranakan Chinese, who adopted or adapted many features of the local culture, especially the language, without assimilating to Indonesian society. Peranakan Chinese in Java not only resisted the kinds of pressures for resinification...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1996) 55 (4): 990–993.
Published: 01 November 1996
... Peranakans of Java, and the Chinese Babas of Melaka, Penang, and Singapore. By examining their languages of daily use, religious practices, and ways of life, he concludes that "the cultural mix was creatively distinctive rather than random, and that the whole had cohered into a stable tradition...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1980) 40 (1): 201–204.
Published: 01 November 1980
... of the complexity of Indonesian Chinese life. Suryadinata's second major contention is that previous studies have contributed to gross categorizations and shallow perceptions of Indonesia's Chinese. In Indonesia, there is a major division between the peranakan and the totok Chinese. In the past these two groups...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1990) 49 (2): 432–433.
Published: 01 May 1990
... abundant in Singapore and Malaysia, and anthropologist Sharon Carstens contributes a concise analytical guide to these underutilized resources. Finally, Dede Oetomo discusses Chinese multilingualism in totok BOOK REVIEWS SOUTHEAST ASIA 4 3 3 and peranakan communities in a number of regions of Indonesia...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (2020) 79 (2): 562–563.
Published: 01 May 2020
.... Most of them were ethnic Chinese, who aspired to “get a well-paying, well-regarded job in the British civil service” (p. 54). Chapter 3 features the Singapore Chinese Girls’ School, founded by Peranakan men (Babas). Its establishment in July 1899 marked “a revolutionary first step by a small...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (2003) 62 (4): 1321–1322.
Published: 01 November 2003
... with no reference to a special issue on "Contestations of Memory in Southeast Asia" that appeared in the Asian Journal of Social Science (29BH2001 Chapter 9 is a discussion of the Peranakan Chinese and the practice of Peranakan mysticism as a much-vaunted illustration of hybridity or cultural synthesis, again...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1985) 44 (2): 471–472.
Published: 01 February 1985
... writers (peranakan and totok) which have heretofore lain neglected in university libraries and private collections. The book is divided into two major parts. The first is a broad survey of the historical development of literary activity among Malay-speaking Chinese in Indonesia from "the beginnings...