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Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1989) 48 (3): 525–544.
Published: 01 August 1989
... married women and their natal families. These practices and ties cannot be accounted for within the framework of the structural-functionalist model and require an adaptation of practiceoriented theory. This may illuminate the specific structuring patterns and disjunctures described below as well...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (2000) 59 (3): 603–646.
Published: 01 August 2000
... of colonial interests into China in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. However, as I shall argue, the invention of this place began much earlier, in the seventeenth century, and owed substantially to the efforts of China's Manchu rulers, who claimed it as their homeland, the terre natale of the Qing...
Image
Published: 01 February 2021
Figure 3. A page from a Nasu genealogical text. This unique text gives the names of the wives and daughters of the Luɦo chieftains and their natal lineages or the lineages into which they married (Yang 2010 ). More
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1999) 58 (4): 1158–1160.
Published: 01 November 1999
... with poor and middle-class Delhi women show the microlevel motivations which lead so many women to refuse even BOOK REVIEWS SOUTH ASIA 1159 the natal property shares to which they are entitled. Basu's focus on women's "profound desires to stay connected with and feel loved by their natal families" (p. 225...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (2012) 71 (4): 1035–1067.
Published: 01 November 2012
... with her sons' children, Wang still resented having been married “down.” Asked if her husband's family had land, she said emphatically that they were too poor (穷), her marital family was a bad one (婆家不好), she still was not used to the life (还不习惯婆家生活), and her natal family was better (娘家好). Brown asked...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1992) 51 (4): 966–967.
Published: 01 November 1992
... to her husband's place is understood differently according to gender and relationship: as dhiyanls, or outmarried village daughters, women tend to believe brides change only gradually and that ties to natal villages are never completely broken. In contrast, the "male view," typified by Hindu husbands...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1992) 51 (4): 965–966.
Published: 01 November 1992
... discovered from his ethnography that the move of a new bride to her husband's place is understood differently according to gender and relationship: as dhiyanls, or outmarried village daughters, women tend to believe brides change only gradually and that ties to natal villages are never completely broken...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (2009) 68 (1): 272–273.
Published: 01 February 2009
... their own values against their natal families and their in-laws, and in doing so, helped shape the intellectual agenda of Ming-Qing Confucian male scholars. Her point is well taken, though self-denial and self-destruction are, it might be added, relatively constrained forms of agency. In more detail...
Journal Article
Far Eastern Quarterly (1955) 15 (1): 133–134.
Published: 01 November 1955
.... The experience of Taiwan reveals what happens when mortality but not fertility is exposed to the impact of modernization and industrialization. One might point also to the case of Java or to that of other lands under certain kinds of colonial rule. Even when a people with high natality and mortality is exposed...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (2001) 60 (4): 1051–1084.
Published: 01 November 2001
.... 1989 . “ Niangjia : Chinese Women and Their Natal Families .” Journal of Asian Studies 48 ( 3 ): 525 –4. Kligman Gail . 1988 . The Wedding of the Dead: Ritual, Poetics, and Popular Culture in Transylvania . Berkeley and Los Angeles : University of California Press . Ko Dorothy...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1978) 37 (4): 792–793.
Published: 01 August 1978
... dance." Even when a serves a much better study. Secondly, one is marriage has taken place, a woman may remain somehow left with the feeling that not only the living with her own natal family; in some in- subject, but its author has been shortchanged. stances, she even continues her courting activi- BOOK...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1989) 48 (3): 489.
Published: 01 August 1989
...." In rural Shandong it is common for young married women to maintain dual residence in their natal and marital families for some time after their wedding and to continue close ties with their natal family indefinitely. ELLEN R. JUDD analyzes the relationship of this practice to the official patrilineal...
Journal Article
Far Eastern Quarterly (1955) 15 (1): 134–136.
Published: 01 November 1955
... to the case of Java or to that of other lands under certain kinds of colonial rule. Even when a people with high natality and mortality is exposed to modernization, fertility tends to fall very slowly, at least in the absence of effective governmental intervention, with the result that its number may increase...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (2023) 82 (3): 441–444.
Published: 01 August 2023
... on the portrayal of filial daughters in local gazetteers. According to Epstein, records from pre-nineteenth-century Shandong depict how women diligently served their parents-in-law instead of their natal parents, as male biographers had little interest in representing women's emotional bonds with their natal...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1981) 40 (4): 784–787.
Published: 01 August 1981
... in a Taiwanese village in 1958, discovered that over half of the marriages in the community deviated from the ideally prescribed form, in which a young woman is transferred as a bride from her natal home to the paternal home of her groom when both are young adults. Instead, many women had been adopted in early...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (2016) 75 (4): 1157–1158.
Published: 01 November 2016
... and resistance. Jassal convincingly demonstrates that women's songs contain many interwoven registers: the political, the affective, and the aesthetic. If they evoke the poignancy of departure from an affirming natal home, they also show ironic awareness of the gendered politics of inheritance that materially...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1999) 58 (1): 235–236.
Published: 01 February 1999
... Hindu), in Uttar Pradesh, northern India. The Jefferys began their research along tamer lines. They set out to look at women's agency in fertility decision making by focusing on three factors: girls' schooling, women's work, and married women's distance from natal kin. But returning to Bijnor in mid...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (2006) 65 (1): 177–178.
Published: 01 February 2006
... as seen in legal cases involving con icts between state authorities and lineage leaders, between the patrilineal families and natal families of brides and widows, and in cases of incest and adultery. One unintended consequence of the aggressive Qing attempt to promote female chastity was that local...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (1978) 37 (4): 793–794.
Published: 01 August 1978
... (e.g., the brideprice) flow from the groom's to the bride's side; and it is the family of the latter which is regarded as superior. A minority of Limbu women choose not to marry at all, and they can inherit part of their natal family's property. Many Limbu marriages end in divorce, especially...
Journal Article
Journal of Asian Studies (2003) 62 (1): 225–227.
Published: 01 February 2003
..., most Na men and women never "marry" in any formal sense and instead take on a succession of lovers over the course of their adult lives, while continuing to 226 THE JOURNAL OF ASIAN STUDIES live (with their mothers, maternal aunts and uncles, siblings, and sisters' children) in their original (natal...