In 2012, Howard Chiang brought together Chinese studies and transgender studies in his edited work, Transgender China. Fast forward nine years, in his latest work, Transtopia in the Sinophone Pacific (2021), we can see two significant shifts in the book title: from “transgender” to “transtopia,” and from “China” to “Sinophone Pacific.” These shifts indicate the two major interventions this new book offers to the fields of both (trans)gender studies and area studies of “China.” By coining the neologism transtopia, Chiang highlights the importance of -topia (place) or geopolitics in doing history about gender mutability and of the diversity of transness in different places and time. The term “Sinophone Pacific” not only represents the deep archive work behind the book but also the “parallel disciplinary move” from “China” to the “Sinophone” (9). The Sinophone concept focuses on the margins of China and Chineseness to emphasize the diversity of Chinese-speaking...

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