According to Devika Sethi, War over Words “locates itself within the traditional model of censorship studies, and its focus is on direct forms of institutionalized and regulatory censorship. It describes censorial institutions, practices, policies, and debates over censorship in the late colonial and early post-colonial periods” (pp. 4–5). Sethi further asserts that “there has been no systematic or detailed attempt to compare censorship policies and practices across these periods” (p. 5). Sethi may well claim novelty when it comes to the “systematic” and “detailed” aspects of her book; indeed, she is to be applauded for due diligence. However, she cannot claim originality as far as the overarching arguments on which it is predicated—that the Raj used censorship systematically and astutely throughout its tenure with varying degrees of success, as well as the fact that the Nehruvian state owed substantively to the precedents of its colonial predecessor with reference to censorship,...

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