Studies of Koreans’ relationships with the Japanese and the Japanese Empire have been undertaken in South Korea during the last three decades. This trend can be understood broadly as an attempt by South Korean scholars to intervene in a colonial history and culture that had been heavily ideology-ridden. They have explored multiple dimensions of colonial culture by engaging with topics that complicate the hierarchy of the colonizer, the colonized, and the imperial order. Also, scholars in the English-speaking world have added nuanced investigations of people and culture in colonial Korea in the last decade in the fields of history, literature, and film, widening the horizon of colonial scholarship. Su Yun Kim's Imperial Romance: Fictions of Colonial Intimacy in Korea, 1905–1945 is a welcome contribution to this growing scholarship that focuses on literary imaginings of elite colonial subjects’ intimate relationships, more specifically intermarriage, which has been understudied. Kim's emphasis rests on...

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